Salisbury parkrun Event#200 – 16th March 2019

By Dr Polly JACOBS

Salisbury parkrun #200-5089

Today Salisbury parkrun celebrated it’s 200th anniversary with 558 runners and walkers crossing the finish line! I remember with excitement the start up of Salisbury parkrun and taking my kids along to the first trials of the route in 2015 before the first official event started. In the beginning, we averaged 175 participants, by 2016 this had grown to 300 and in 2017 & 2018 the average participation number was 450. Although this year, the average turnout is 540, there have been two notable record turnouts of 610 and 617. What an awesome achievement!

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It is hard to imagine that in 2004 when parkrun started the average finish time was 22:16. Since then, the average finish time has got slower every single year which I think is one of parkrun’s greatest achievements. By 2017 the average finish time had risen to 29:06. It’s not rocket science to work out that this is because of the inclusive nature of these events and how much parkrun welcomes people who are new to fitness and new to running and the brilliant presence of walkers alongside those running.

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Last year, Salisbury Medical Practice became a “parkrun Registered Practice” and I am delighted that 14 members of our staff and their families were part of the volunteer team today. I love the community and friendship of parkrun, I love encouraging my kids to get around the course and I love the joy of a new PB (well done Cameron on your PB of 21:43 today!), but the thing that gives me the biggest high is seeing a patient turn up to parkrun for the first time after I've suggested it to them in a consultation. To be honest, the even greater high is when they come back again the week after, realising I wasn’t lying and that it’s not an event exclusive to seasoned runners! Much as the course can feel busy at times with the need to overtake or be overtaken. I love the opportunity this presents to encourage faster and slower runners on the way around.

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parkrun is probably one of my most frequent “prescriptions” and for many people I think the benefit of exercise, being outdoors, friendship and community probably has far more to offer than some drugs, and for those needing medication it is a fantastic add on. I am probably a little biased, but having experienced a few parkruns around the country I honestly think Salisbury is the most welcoming and friendly I’ve ever encountered and there are some incredible unsung volunteer heroes that give their time week after week to create this atmosphere. It’s notable that some parts of our course are even named after the marshals that are almost always at that point in the route. The frequent presence of CoSARC members and Sarum Sisters to pace and volunteer and even yarnbomb the park brings the different parts of our running community together.

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Let’s keep encouraging more people to come. Let’s continue to make Salisbury a truly welcoming and inclusive parkrun and let’s get that average finish time even slower this year to prove that we’ve introduced even more people who are new to fitness to this remarkable free event.

Here’s to another 200 Salisbury parkruns!!

Salisbury parkrun #200-6680

STATISTICS

This week 558 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 38 were first timers and 73 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 30 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 45 volunteers:

James MILLS • Elizabeth ROBERTS • Elly MILLS • Andy ROBBINS • Jef HUTCHBY • Jeanette HARDIMAN • Polly JACOBS • Michael BECKETT • John SOWRAY • Matthew WHICHER • Lisa MILNER • Lizzie GUASCH • Melody BROWN • Penny ALVIS • Chris COLLETT • James BALLARD • Alison MORRIS • Terry BROWN • Judy BURNS • Michael WINTER • Jackie HASSAN • Katy LEE • John DUFFY • Joseph DUFFY • Andrew WEBB • Denise VON RORETZ • Christine ROMANO • Christine WEBB • Alissa CHISHOLM • Colin MARTIN • Anne NORMAN • Nicola COOMBS • Lorna WILSON • Wendy HERBERT • Katherine HERBERT • Daniel HENDERSON • Robert LANGHAMMER • David HINER • Jane CUTLER • Martin JUHASZ • Katy GILLINGHAM • Hannah HARRISON • Toni CULL • Lisa NEWMAN • Andrew LEE

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Salisbury parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Adrian MUSSETT who recorded a time of 15:23 on 8th August 2015 (event number 10).
The female record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded a time of 16:56 on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).
The Age Grade course record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded 92.81% (16:56) on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).

Salisbury parkrun started on 6th June 2015. Since then 8,874 participants have completed 72,920 parkruns covering a total distance of 364,600 km, including 13,961 new Personal Bests. A total of 653 individuals have volunteered 6,658 times.

 

Salisbury parkrun Event#198 – 2nd March 2019

Salisbury – The Running City?

By Linda ROBSON

Salisbury parkrun #198-3598

So this week over 500 runners and walkers again tackled and completed the four laps of Salisbury parkrun. Since the first event almost four years ago numbers have steadily risen and this year has already seen a new record for Salisbury of 617 participants. These numbers are also reflected in the attendance of local running clubs CoSARC and Sarum Sisters which have both seen record turnouts in the past few weeks (120+ and 80+ respectively). Those of us who have been running addicts for many years recognise the physical, mental and social benefits of our sport and, as such, it is wonderful to see this steady increase in participants as more and more people discover the benefits of regular running and walking. It has also got me wondering; is there any town or city of comparable size that has such a vibrant and inclusive running scene?

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There are so many opportunities to run, walk, race and volunteer within quite a small geographical area. We have parkrun, of course, and the recent addition of junior parkrun for under 15s. There’s City of Salisbury Athletics and Running Club (CoSARC) that caters for all abilities from complete beginners to 'Speedy McCreedies’ who can run a mile, with relative ease, in around five minutes. Sarum Sisters cater for adult females by providing a safe, sociable running environment for beginners and improvers. There are also off-shoots of these groups including Salisbury Trail Runners – a ‘virtual’ running group whose members host a variety of sociable Sunday trail run throughout the year.

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Within a ten mile radius of the city there are numerous running events covering every distance, terrain and demographic;

♦ Salisbury parkrun

♦ Churchill Gardens junior parkrun

♦ Salisbury 10 Mile Road Race

♦ Salisbury Half Marathon

♦ Downton Half Marathon

♦ 54321 – multi terrain, multiple distances from 10k to ultra marathon

♦ Race For Life – 5k and 10k at Hudson's Field

♦ Race For Men – 10k and half marathon at Hudson's Field

♦ Stonehenge Stomp – multi distance, multi terrain 5k up to 40k, walkers & runners

♦ Figsbury Challenge – up to 5k with longer distances from 2019, great family event

♦ Small Schools Mini Marathon – for the little folk

♦ Clarendon Trail Marathon and Half Marathon

♦ Great Wishford 10k

♦ Chalke Valley Challenge

♦ Shrewton Bustard 10K

♦ Fordingbridge Firestation 10K

♦ Breamore 5K & 10K

Imber Ultra

♦ Plain Crazy

Larmer Tree 10K, 10 Mile, Half Marathon, Marathon

Neolithic Marathon, Half Marathon & Relay (discontinued from 2019)

Salisbury parkrun #198-5043Salisbury parkrun #198-4711Salisbury parkrun #198-4911

Apologies if I’ve left any out! 2018 saw a lot of negative press for our city. Running, and indeed walking, have so many positives and I believe that Salisbury should be truly proud of its running communities and events and should be promoted as The Running City.

Salisbury parkrun #198-3593

STATISTICS

This week 502 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 50 were first timers and 59 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 20 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 30 volunteers:

Elizabeth ROBERTS • Elly MILLS • Andy ROBBINS • Jef HUTCHBY • Craig MURPHY • Linda ROBSON • Jeanette HARDIMAN • John SOWRAY • Matthew WHICHER • Lizzie GUASCH • Melody BROWN • Ruaridh THOMSON EASTER • James BALLARD • Ali THEOBALD • Michael WINTER • Karen CRADDOCK • Amelia WATLING • John DUFFY • Joseph DUFFY • Andrew WEBB • Denise VON RORETZ • Alissa CHISHOLM • Colin MARTIN • Sophie CUNNINGHAM • Jo MCCULLAM • Anne NORMAN • Lorna WILSON • Sylvie GERVAIS • David HINER • Martin JUHASZ

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Salisbury parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Adrian MUSSETT who recorded a time of 15:23 on 8th August 2015 (event number 10).
The female record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded a time of 16:56 on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).
The Age Grade course record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded 92.81% (16:56) on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).

Salisbury parkrun started on 6th June 2015. Since then 8,796 participants have completed 71,831 parkruns covering a total distance of 359,155 km, including 13,817 new Personal Bests. A total of 640 individuals have volunteered 6,574 times.

 

Salisbury parkrun Event#197 – 23rd February 2019

By Linda ROBSON

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parkrun wouldn’t exist without runners and walkers turning up each week but it COULDN’T exist without the legions of volunteers that also turn up week-in week-out in all weathers to fill one of the many and varied roles. Salisbury is so lucky to regularly get 30-plus volunteers and can almost always fill the majority of roles. All are heroes but some, I believe, are more heroic than others. One such hero is our Co-Event Director Elizabeth Roberts.

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On Friday night at The Salisbury Journal Sports Awards she was shortlisted for the Unsung Hero Award for her outstanding voluntary support of Salisbury’s running community. Unfortunately she missed out on actually winning the award so this week’s run report is by way of a tribute and a thank you to her for all that she does for running in Salisbury. Liz was one of the lead campaigners for bringing parkrun to Salisbury - a mission that took her almost two years to achieve but now, almost four years later, we have all benefited from her determination and perseverance. parkrun benefits runners of all ages and abilities as well as encouraging running tourists to visit the weekly event and the City of Salisbury. There are very few weeks that Liz isn’t either Run Directing or running (usually as a pacer) Salisbury parkrun. She has also been instrumental in introducing initiatives such as Walk-to-Run, volunteer takeovers and pacing events not only as a way of getting more people involved in the event but also to promote local running groups and clubs.

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Liz is very involved in two of Salisbury’s running clubs. She is the joint Road Running manager for City of Salisbury Athletics and Running Club (CoSARC) and regularly runs beginner courses for the club. She is on the organizing committees of CoSARC’s annual Salisbury 10 mile race and the Stonehenge Stomp. For each of these events she recruits and organizes up to a 100 volunteers every year. As a leader of Sarum Sisters womens’ running group she regularly organizes sessions, supports and encourages members of all abilities to achieve and exceed their running goals. For example, she will encourage Sarum Sisters who wish to run at the next level to join CoSARC and will run with them for their first few sessions in order to support and encourage this transition.

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Charities such as Cancer Research UK have been well supported by Liz in terms of promoting, supporting, recruiting volunteers and marshalling events such as the Cancer Research Race for Life and the Race for Men. For both parkrun and the Salisbury 10 she organizes litter picking sessions which benefit the non-running, as well as the running, community. Liz is an absolute inspiration for everyone with whom she comes into contact. Within ten years she has come from being a complete novice to an experienced and prolific marathon runner (she has to date completed in excess of 80 marathons and ultra marathons) as well as being one of the main ambassadors for running in and around the Salisbury area. There are very few local running events or organizations with whom she is not involved at some level. She dedicates most weekends and countless more hours to planning and organizing for the various groups and committees with whom she is involved.

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So thank you Liz you really are a hero to the Salisbury running and parkrun community.

STATISTICS

This week 515 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 50 were first timers and 69 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 30 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 36 volunteers:

James MILLS • Elizabeth ROBERTS • Jef HUTCHBY • Linda ROBSON • Jeanette HARDIMAN • John SOWRAY • Matthew WHICHER • Lisa MILNER • Lizzie GUASCH • Melody BROWN • James BALLARD • Ali THEOBALD • Lee SYRETT • Michael WINTER • Kieran MCMANUS • Peter SYRETT • Amelia WATLING • Paul WATLING • Paul SLAUGHTER • John DUFFY • Andrew WEBB • Denise VON RORETZ • Christine WEBB • Alissa CHISHOLM • Suzanne RAWLE • John ROBERTS • Joe CUNNINGHAM • Jessica RICHARDS • Jo MCCULLAM • Maria Elena RUIZ-ZAMORA • Jason RIFAT • Wendy HERBERT • Katherine HERBERT • George HERBERT • Robert LANGHAMMER • Martin JUHASZ

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Salisbury parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Adrian MUSSETT who recorded a time of 15:23 on 8th August 2015 (event number 10).
The female record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded a time of 16:56 on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).
The Age Grade course record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded 92.81% (16:56) on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).

Salisbury parkrun started on 6th June 2015. Since then 8,746 participants have completed 71,329 parkruns covering a total distance of 356,645 km, including 13,758 new Personal Bests. A total of 639 individuals have volunteered 6,544 times.

 

Salisbury parkrun Event#196 – 16th February 2019 World Pangolin Day !

Happy World Pangolin Day!!

By Elizabeth ROBERTS

Temmincks Ground Pangolin Darren Pietersen
Temminck's Ground Pangolin   Photo by Darren Pietersen

Today, Saturday 16th February, is the eighth annual #WorldPangolinDay to highlight the plight of these fascinating mammals. Pangolins are the only known mammal covered in hard overlapping scales made of keratin (the same material as our fingernails) and are also known as Scaly Anteaters. The scales make up a fifth of a Pangolin's body weight. It is only through convergent evolution that they are known as “anteaters”, as they are unrelated to the Anteaters of South America.
White Bellied Pangolin by Darren Pietersen
White-Bellied Pangolin   Photo by Darren Pietersen
There are eight species of Pangolin; four in Africa – Temminck's Ground Pangolin (or Cape Pangolin), White Bellied Pangolin (or Tree Pangolin), Black Bellied Pangolin (or Long Tailed Pangolin) and Giant Ground Pangolin, and four in Asia – Sunda Pangolin, Chinese Pangolin, Indian Pangolin and Philippine Pangolin. The Asian species have bristles appearing between their scales, the African species do not. The Pangolin diet almost exclusively consists of ants and termites which they catch with their very long and sticky tongues (up to 40cm in length) and they do not have teeth. They swallow small stones which improve digestion; the stones grind up the food in their stomach. Their tongues are often longer than their bodies and are attached near the pelvis. It is estimated that a Pangolin consumes 70 million insects per year.
Indian Pangolin Gerald Cubitt
Indian Pangolin   Photo by Gerald Cubitt
The Pangolin is nocturnal and their lifespan is around twenty years. The smallest Pangolin is the African Black Bellied Pangolin which grows to around 12-16 inches in length and up to 2.50 kgs and the largest is the Giant Ground Pangolin, also an African species, which grows to 4.50 feet in length and weighs up to 33 kgs. They are predated by Humans, Lions, Tigers, Leopards, Hyenas & Pythons. They have poor eyesight and rely on hearing and smell to sense their prey and when predators are nearby. Some of the ground-dwelling Pangolins are bipedal. They have strong front claws for digging into termite mounds and ants nests and when they walk, they hold their tail off the ground as a counter-balance. Due to the scales, I always think they look like they're wearing a little pair of wellington boots on their back legs!
Ground Pangolin Darren Pietersen1
Temminck's Ground Pangolin Photo by Darren Pietersen

Some species are arboreal, such as the Black Bellied Pangolin, and have prehensile tails with pads on the underside for climbing. This Pangolin's tail is twice the length of it's body. Others live on the ground and hide away in burrows during the day – the Ground Pangolin of Africa is mostly found in dry, savannah habitat and it's close cousin, the Giant Pangolin is found closer to wetland areas. There is very little footage of the Giant Pangolin due to it's nocturnal and secretive nature, although recently they have been captured on film at Uganda's Ziwa Wildlife Sanctuary: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-47200816

Black Bellied Pangolin Rod Cassidy
Black-Bellied Pangolin   Photo by Rod Cassidy

It is estimated that the Pangolin has been around for 80 million years (compare that with Homo Sapiens' quite unimpressive 300,000 years) and although originally thought to be related to the Xenarthra family (including Anteaters, Sloths and Armadillos), it is now thought to be more closely related to the Carnivora family which includes Hyenas, Bears and Wolves. The eight Pangolin species entirely make up the Order, Pholidota.

Philippine Pangolin Roger Dolorosa
Philippine Pangolin   Photo by Roger Dolorosa

With a top speed of only 3 mph, the defence strategy of the Pangolin is to roll up into a ball, and this is where their name comes from; it is derived from the Malay word “penggulung” which means “one who rolls up”. This reaction to a threat is no defence against humans however, and leaves the Pangolin open to being very easily poached from the wild resulting in the situation today, which is that all species are under threat of imminent extinction with the Pangolin in the devastating position of being the world's most trafficked mammal. Their meat is considered a delicacy and, despite a lack of evidence, the scales are used to treat a variety of ailments in traditional Chinese medicine.

Chinese Pangolin Sarita Jnawali
Chinese Pangolin   Photo by Sarita Jnawali

The Chinese Pangolin and the Sunda Pangolin of Asia are considered “critically endangered”, and with the Asian species' numbers in serious decline, the threat of poaching for the African Pangolins has increased markedly. All species are under threat from destruction of their habitat by human activity. For example, populations of Pangolin in China have been reduced by 94%. Pangolins do not do well in captivity, due to capture-induced stress and their specialised diet; 70% will die in captivity within one year. Numbers are not known, but the rarity of sightings in the wild along with the massive increase in volume of illegally trafficked Pangolins suggests that all species are very close to extinction. The International Union for Conservation & Nature (IUCN) estimates that over one million Pangolins were caught and killed over the past decade … a Pangolin is illegally poached from the wild every five minutes. The illegal trade in Pangolins is thought to be worth £12.7 billion, per year. Their scales are worth between $600 and $1,000 per kilo.

Sunda Pangolin Michael Pitts
Sunda Pangolin   Photo by Michael Pitts

There is a fascinating BBC documentary about Pangolins and the work done in Namibia by Maria Diekmann, founder and director of the Rare & Endangered Species Trust, which is well worth watching https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0b3gg0t/natural-world-20182019-5-pangolins-the-worlds-most-wanted-animal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbnBYh-BJ1g A very amusing video all about Anteaters, Echidnas, Numbats and Pangolins.

STATISTICS

This week 568 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 42 were first timers and 93 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 29 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 66 Record Breaking volunteers:

Elizabeth ROBERTS • Elly MILLS • Andy ROBBINS • Jef HUTCHBY • Linda ROBSON • Philippa Helen BREWER • Sara FRASER • Jeanette HARDIMAN • Clare WILLS • Debbie HORNE • John SOWRAY • Lisa MILNER • Lizzie GUASCH • Andrew INGLETON • Sarah WIDGINGTON • Kathryn DREYER • Emily WELLS • Helen KEEL • Amanda ANSELL • Ali THEOBALD • Esther HORWOOD • Sally BRADLEY • Clare CLIFFORD • Sue SHEPPARD • Carol EATON • Christine TYLER • Clare KING • Lu YARWOOD • Heather HITCHINS • Jason YARWOOD • Steven MITCHELL • Art MITCHELL • Michael WINTER • Joshua SHARPS • Karen CRADDOCK • Kieran MCMANUS • Louise PITMAN • Bethany KING • Alison WATSON • Jackie HASSAN • Monica EDMONDS • Janine KEMM • Eleanor WEATHERBURN • Annie KEMP • Denise VON RORETZ • Christine WEBB • Ann BLONDEL • Suzanne RAWLE • Jennifer DAVIES • Neve COUSINS • Harriet CLIFFORD • Colin MARTIN • Sophie CUNNINGHAM • Petra OYSTON • Helen LATEO • Helen CARLTON • Chevonne SLADE • Jackie CHAMBERLAIN • Carole WILTSHIRE • Louise WEBBER • Isabel ELGY • Lisa PHAURE • Alyssa BROCKWAY • Shelley TOLCHER • David HINER • Lydia DAVIS

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Salisbury parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Adrian MUSSETT who recorded a time of 15:23 on 8th August 2015 (event number 10).
The female record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded a time of 16:56 on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).
The Age Grade course record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded 92.81% (16:56) on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).

Salisbury parkrun started on 6th June 2015. Since then 8,696 participants have completed 70,814 parkruns covering a total distance of 354,070 km, including 13,690 new Personal Bests. A total of 638 individuals have volunteered 6,507 times.

 

 

Salisbury parkrun Event#193 – 19th January 2019

By Craig WEATHERBURN

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Possible typical Saturday morning diary of a “parkrun runner”…….. is this you?

7:00am

Wake up to the dawning realisation that it’s parkrun day (formerly known as Saturday)…followed by the relaxing sensation that the beginning of your weekend is not going to be wasted by spending the morning in bed / on the sofa watching TV, but instead it will be spent being awesome doing something you love – running!

7:01am

Must get up and eat sensible carbohydrate filled breakfast” – proper rolled oats porridge made with water, mixed with a scoop of natural yoghurt topped with half a banana and perhaps a drizzle of honey = Rocket fuel. Throw in a cup of Arabica finest for that caffeine kick and you’re all set.

7:30am

Congratulate yourself that you’ve got that inside you by 7:30am giving it the pre-requisite 90minutes to digest and top up those glycogen stores before Parkrun starts.

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7:31am

Flick through various App’s on your smartphone whilst keeping one eye on the clock to ensure you leave enough time to Get Ready For The Run.

8:10am

Clear the table, load the dishwasher (optional) then get ready to……”Get Ready For The Run”

8:15am

Running top? Tick. Compression shorts / bottoms / tights / underwear? Tick. Running socks? Tick. Running shoes? Tick. Take a moment to “wonder why they call them Running Shoes when they’re actually trainers?” Tick. Running hat? Tick. GPS Running watch / GPS Smartphone App? Tick. Sports flask of water? Tick. Laces ok? No, re-do them. Barcode! Barcode! DFYBC! (Don’t Forget. Your. Barcode.) Heart palpitations. Barcode acquired. Tick. Laces ok? No, re-do them. Lightweight jacket? Tick.

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8:23am

Look at the clock. More heart palpitations! Got to get going. Got to get going or I’ll miss it!

8:24am

Re-do your laces.

8:25am

Set off for parkrun.

8:40am

Made it to the entrance of Churchill Gardens. Relax. Drift in with the usual 400 plus eclectic mix of runners and walkers whilst trying to quell the unmistakeable twinge of nerves, excitement and slight apprehensiveness of what will happen at 9:00am – whilst at the same time wishing it WAS 9am.

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8:45am

Yep…most of the usual faces are here. That’s comforting. Now where’s the tarpaulin? *Locates tarpaulin and stands near it, not quite wanting to take off the jacket yet as it’s a bit nippy*

8:50am

Oooo…Run Director briefing. It’s getting closer to 9am. Take off jacket. Drop on to tarpaulin. Do a sort of shuffle jog thing followed by a few random stretches of various body parts, all the while acknowledging that you really don’t know what you’re doing and that you’re just sort of cobbling together some sort of pre-run warm up that you’ve gleaned from the internet (possibly the odd book / magazine) and by watching what other runners do…….

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8:51am

Locate the fellow runner whom you secretly battle with each week (come on, we all have one) promising yourself that this week you will give it everything and beat said fellow runner all the while getting a new PB and then thank fellow runner for unwittingly spurring you on to a new PB. After all, it’s NOT a race. Is it?

8:55am

Briefing in full swing. Actively join in the applause for all the AAVWGUTSMSTWCEO’s (Absolutely Awesome Volunteers Whom Give Up Their Saturday Morning Such That We Can Enjoy Ours). Marvel at the community spirit created and feel right at home among people whom are there for one common reason. Running/walking 5k.

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8:59am

OMG. Oh Yes. Oh No. Help. Get In. We’ve just been directed to the start line…..

8:59 & 30 seconds

Positive part of brain: “New PB?”

Negative side of brain: “No. Just run easy and enjoy it”

Positive part of brain: No! Give it everything and strive for a new PB!

Negative side of brain: “But, but, but……”

9:00am

GO! (to the sound of circa 300 GPS devices being started in unison…….)

To be continued……………….(the diary of a 5k parkrun – run)

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STATISTICS

This week 503 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 57 were first timers and 50 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 20 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 43 volunteers:

James MILLS • Elizabeth ROBERTS • Elly MILLS • Jef HUTCHBY • John DUFFY • Craig MURPHY • Joanne FOTHERINGHAM • Jeanette HARDIMAN • John SOWRAY • Matthew WHICHER • Lisa MILNER • Lizzie GUASCH • Vasen MOODLEY • Chris COLLETT • James BALLARD • Ali THEOBALD • Alfie BAYLISS • Christine TYLER • Gayle MORRIS • Heather HITCHINS • Michael WINTER • Joshua SHARPS • Ben SMITH • Jane BUTLER • Alison WATSON • Denise VON RORETZ • Graham BLONDEL • Christine WEBB • Craig WEATHERBURN • Kirstyn SHERWOOD • Colin MARTIN • Rosie ELLIOTT • Flora DENNES • Helen CARLTON • Anne NORMAN • Steve ROBINSON • Peter MORT • David GERVAIS • Wendy HERBERT • Katherine HERBERT • Robert LANGHAMMER • David HINER • Claire YATES

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Salisbury parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Adrian MUSSETT who recorded a time of 15:23 on 8th August 2015 (event number 10).
The female record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded a time of 16:56 on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).
The Age Grade course record is held by Beatrice WOOD who recorded 92.81% (16:56) on 26th May 2018 (event number 157).

Salisbury parkrun started on 6th June 2015. Since then 8,549 participants have completed 69,163 parkruns covering a total distance of 345,815 km, including 13,432 new Personal Bests. A total of 631 individuals have volunteered 6,360 times.

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