COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 7 July

From parkrun HQ

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Saturday saw the long-awaited return of parkrun New Zealand, the first parkrun events back after an extended global lockdown, and a return, in that part of the world at least, to pre-Coronavirus routines. Since the earliest days of this challenge we had prioritised the work required to ensure a smooth return to action when the time was right, and I’m pleased to report that 4,000 people walked, jogged, ran, or volunteered across 29 different event locations. It was also incredibly moving to see each of those events celebrate a different parkrun country, in what was a wonderful acknowledgement that Saturday represented the first step of our journey to reopen events around the world.

As great a moment as that was however, those of us across the other 21 parkrun countries are keener than ever to understand when and how our own events might return. Also understandably, many people would like some clarity around what specific conditions might be required in order to enable parkrun countries to reopen. For example, a level of infections, restrictions on size of gatherings, or guidance around social distancing. It remains our position however, that rather than lobbying or campaigning for our events to be allowed to return or to be given specific targets as to when that may happen, our strategy is to continue surveying parkrunners and parkrun volunteers, and to keep collaborating with our key stakeholders and public health experts, with the aim of making the right decision at the right time, based on each specific country’s unique situation.

We do not feel it is appropriate to provide hard and fast commitments that when X happens we will reopen. However, we’re continually seeing positive news around the world, bringing us all closer to returning to our parks and open spaces, something we are committed to making happen as soon as possible once it is safe and appropriate to do so.

We’re getting through this together.

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 7 July

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 30 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 23 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 16 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

(not)parkrun, week 03

 

It looks like (not)parkrun’s here to stay for a while, and here at Ashton Court parkrun we’ve taken to it like a duck might have taken to all the recent rain.
 
uk totals
 
global totals
 
We’re remarkably consistent in one aspect, as following the 1st 2 weeks when 74 and then 73 of us recorded (not)parkruns, there were 76 of us who did so last week. Meanwhile the number of (not)parkruns each of us records is on the rise, having moved from 114 to 117 and last week, up to 143.
 
ac new totals
 
Which means we’re still in 5th place in the UK in terms of how many (not)parkruns folk from Ashton Court parkrun have recorded. We’ve slipped down to 14th position in terms of how many of us participated last week.
 
result summary
 
14 of the 76 who took part last week were doing so for the first time, and 36 of the remaining 62 of us each achieved at least one pb during the week.
 
ac new totals
 
The same 5 names are at the top of the list of how many (not)parkruns have been completed ~ Andrew Thomas, Tim Carr, Roger Brocklesby, Louise Nikou and Marie Malloy ~ and as one other Ashton Court parkrunner has joined them in double figures he’s been added to the list as well.
 
ac not how many
 
I mentioned last week that Paul Stuart had recorded a time of 20:02 for his (not)parkrun in week 1, and then in week 2 too. Could Paul repeat the feat in week 3?

And no, he couldn’t, because this time he recorded 19:39, which is brilliant of course and yet “only” puts Paul in 2nd place on last week’s (not)podium, since Marcus Kropacsy recorded a breathtaking 19:03 for his (not)parkrun.

For context, Marcus’ time is 14 seconds slower than his best ever Ashton Court time, and Paul’s is 5 seconds faster than his best. Great running by both.

Shaun Popel meanwhile took the “if you can’t beat them, join them” option, and recorded 20:22 for the 2nd consecutive week.
 
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Liz Hill made her (not)parkrun debut last week ~ the 100th Ashton Court parkrunner to do so ~ and recorded 23:21, just 5 seconds short of her Ashton Court pb.

On Saturday morning I saw Katie Waterson flying across Ashton Avenue Bridge, and as she went by, she gasped “can’t stop, think I’m on for a good time”. Katie got that right as she recorded 23:30, 56 seconds quicker than her Ashton Court pb!
 
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Here's Katie Waterson, on her way to exceeding her expectations (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
In last week's report I mentioned that Elena Thode Minguet was one of two females to beat 25 minutes. During the last week, Elena’s beaten 24 minutes twice and now has a (not)parkrun pb of 23:37 ~ 15 seconds faster than her pb at Ashton Court parkrun.
 
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If there were to be a “race” for the best ever (not)parkrun age grade, it’s over! Last week Anne Dockery joined in and recorded 24:20, and being in the VW70-74 age category, Anne’s score of 94.59% is the (not)parkrun equivalent of taking the bat and ball home!

What a wonderful performance! Those of us who know Anne also know that if there were a prize for this sort of thing, no-one would deserve it more. I’m looking forward to reporting a score of over 95% in the coming weeks!
 
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I’ve focussed on the fastest and the highest, because to be honest it's easier, and there are only 7 days in most weeks after all. But huge congratulations go to every one of the 111 of us from Ashton Court parkrun who’ve recorded a (not)parkrun in the last 3 weeks.
 
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ac not how many ran each week
The weather’s been a bit rubbish (is it really July?) and for many of us, having to cope with the current situation makes it easier to stay indoors rather than get changed, get out and get breathless!

So let’s all reach round and pat ourselves on the back!
 
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A couple of familiar Ashton Court trees on Thursday afternoon (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
At the time of writing there are already 13 (not)parkruns on the board for this week, including 4 first timers and 2 pbs. No doubt there’ll be plenty more to write about in 7 days’ time.

 
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1986-09-01 queenstown gardens

Part of the course at Queenstown parkrun, on New Zealand's South Island, follows the footpath around the trees on the peninsula jutting out into Lake Wakatipu. The mountains beyond ~ Cecil Peak on the left, Walter Peak to the right ~ are a little higher than we're accustomed to at Ashton Court, being 1,978m and 1,800m high respectively (photo: Rich Kenington, 1986-09-01)
 

Thanks as always for joining in with this (not)parkrun fun ~ in particular Melanie Young who once again took on the role of Tail Walker this week!

Let's all have the best week we possibly can, and see you next time!

Report by Rich Kenington, 6 (not)parkruns last week | 11 (not)parkruns total

 

(not)parkrun, week 02

 

parkrun’s recent (not)parkrun idea looks as if it might catch on, especially here at Ashton Court, which we’re delighted ~ if not surprised ~ to see.
 
uk totals
 
The (not)parkrun week runs from Monday to Sunday, and during week 1, 74 of us whose home parkrun is Ashton Court registered 114 (not)parkruns. By the end of week 2 on Sunday 28 June, 73 of us had posted 117 (not)parkruns.
 
global totals
 
Of course during week 1 all 74 for of us were (not)parkrun first-timers, and in week 2, 50 of us returned and were joined by 23 (not)parkrun first-timers.
 
ac totals
 
19 of the 50 who returned during week 2 recorded faster times and are shown in the results with (not)parkrun pbs.
 
ac new totals
 
Across the UK during week 1, 17,578 (not)parkruns were completed by 13,520 parkrunners. We were thrilled to see that our total of 114 (not)parkruns was the 4th highest recorded on behalf of any parkrun, not only in the UK but all over the world!
 
01 result summary
 
The numbers rose a little during week 2, when 20,215 (not)parkruns were recorded by 15,094 parkrunners. This time we were 8th in the table, although we only missed 5th place by 5 (not)parkruns!
 
02 result summary
 
Of particular interest to the Brocklesbys, Goudes and Keningtons of the world is that ahead of us are 2 parkruns in the East Riding, and 1 in Yorkshire’s capital city.

Hull parkrunners registered 162 (not)parkruns last week: those from Beverley Westwood registered 135, and those from York parkrun posted another 121. Hull and Beverley are only 7 miles apart, and York Racecourse is another 28 miles up the road from Beverley Westwood.
 
But I digress! Back here at home, Andrew Thomas leads the way, having registered 13 (not)parkruns by midnight on Sunday. Hard on his heels are Tim Carr with 12, Roger Brocklesby with 10, Louise Nikou with 8 and Marie Malloy with 7.
 
ac not how many
 
In terms of times, not only has Paul Stuart recorded the fastest (not)parkrun time posted by an Ashton Court parkrunner of 20:02, he’s run that same time in both his (not)parkruns to-date. No pressure whatsoever then Paul, in week 3!

Shaun Popel’s recorded 20:22, Andrew Capel 20:27 and Marcus Kropacsy 20:40.
 
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Laura Piper leads the way for the females with 24:17, and the only other female to get below 25 minutes is Elena Thode Minguet, who recorded 24:30. Knocking on the sub 25 minute door are Janet O’Connell (25:13), Helen Sawyer (25:14), Marie Malloy (25:16) and Cathryn Hoffmann (25:36).
 
ac not times f2
 
Paul Stuart sits (panting, presumably) on top of the age-grade ladder, having recorded 73.63%. Twice!

Next is Janet O’Connell, who scored 71.78%, then Martin Gillett with 71.34%, Alan Wilcox (70.57%), Caroline Potter (69.92%) and Helen Sawyer (69.88%). Worth mentioning that Martin Gillett’s in the V75-79 age category, and his time was 28:09.
 
ac age grades m
 
ac age grades f
 
Paul Stuart's achievement in completing both his (not)parkruns in the same time means of course that he missed out on a (not)parkrun pb by just 1 second, which meant that "only" 19 of the 50 returning (not)parkrunners recorded a faster time in week 2 than week 1. Congratulations to all of you!
 
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Flying feet uphill? No wonder Jane Duffus recorded a (not)pb on Saturday! (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
There's a feeling around that while we're unable to run our own little parkrun with its hill in the middle, this is a good time to seek out 5k routes with no uphills involved. Perhaps a combination of flat and downhill, or better still, entirely downhill.

I found that this isn't as simple as it sounds, mostly because of the need to get to the top of whichever summit you've decided to tumble down, before you can commence tumbling. And having become used to 2½k downhill, when the final kilometre is flat it's hard work.

It's "fun" finding out though, and I know others have been more successful than me in employing gravity to finish faster!
 
Whether it's parkrun, not-parkrun or (not)parkrun, the main thing is that it's fun to walk and run. It's great to see 5 (not)parkrunners in our (not)results who haven't yet taken part in a parkrun, and I hope that whenever we are able to chase one another up and down the hill once more they'll come along and join us.

It's also been a nice surprise to see names like Niall Hoskin and Martin Brasher in these (not)results ~ parkrunners we've not see in real life for far too long and who we'd love to welcome back once this hiatus is behind us.
 
Of course no parkrun of any kind is complete without a Tail Walker, and so we must thank Melanie Young for unselfishly filling that role in both our (not)parkrun weeks.
 
Thank you all for joining in. Let's keep having parkrun/not-parkrun/(not)parkrun fun, keep safe and well, and carry on being socially sensible
 
2020-06-28 hill

Ashton Court estate on Sunday evening (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
 

Report by Rich Kenington, 2 (not)parkruns last week | 5 (not)parkruns total

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 30 June

From Tom Williams, Chief Operating Officer, parkrun Global

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With just a few days left until the reopening of parkrun New Zealand it feels like we really are making excellent progress and, after fifteen Saturdays without a single parkrun anywhere in the world, this weekend we can all celebrate a great step forward.

Everyone has worked hard and waited patiently, and we can all be proud to be part of the wonderful, global, parkrun family.
 
Across the other 21 countries that host parkrun events, things are also changing rapidly. Since last week, for example, we’ve seen significant relaxations in the Netherlands and Australia. Of course, it’s not all positive though, and in the last 24 hours we’ve also seen localised lockdown in part of the UK.
 
We continue to follow global developments very closely, and every morning meet (virtually) to discuss where things are, what needs to be done to support parkrun communities right now, and what needs to be put in place so that we can reopen when the time is right.
 
We’ve held those meetings every single working day since lockdown started, and it’s very clear that, so far, things are moving in a positive direction and every day is a day closer to being back in our parks and open spaces, together.
 
However, we know that reopening our events (or keeping them closed) at a given time will be controversial in the eyes of some members of our community. Not because they’re wrong and we’re right, but because with a global family numbering seven million people there will be healthy differences of opinion.
 
We will each interpret information and risk differently, and faced with the same challenges we will each form different conclusions. As we look ahead therefore we expect that there could be a period of time where many people feel we should be open, when we’re not, but then a time when many people feel we shouldn’t be open, when we are. During that time we will be collaborative in our decision making, transparent with our reasoning, and take responsibility for our actions.
 
Thanks, as always, for your incredible parkrun passion.
 
We are getting through this, together.
 
Tom Williams
Chief Operating Officer
parkrun Global

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 30 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 23 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 16 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 23 June

From Tom Williams, Chief Operating Officer, parkrun Global

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Over the last few months we’ve attempted to keep things as simple as possible, to focus on the critical tasks required, and to provide clarity around our decisions.

This week we’d like to take the opportunity to revisit part of our strategy for reopening parkrun.
 
As countries relax their respective lockdown restrictions we find situations where certain events could operate (legally and safely) but are having to wait for other events (that could be many thousands of miles away) to be in the same position.
 
For example, in Poland many (but not all) parkrun events have attendance records someway short of the 150 participant limit currently allowed by their Government.
 
Some states of Australia have relaxed restrictions such that parkrun could return, whilst this isn’t the case in other states. The Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, and the Falkland Islands may be considered technically able to start, but the UK as a whole is some way from it being appropriate to relaunch our events.
 
Reopening specific regions within parkrun countries brings with it many complexities, not least the need to understand more localised public health guidance, respond accordingly, and ensure that we don’t create issues for neighbouring regions. As such, at this time, our policy remains that we will only open parkrun events where we can safely and appropriately open every event in that country.
 
We would particularly like to thank those events waiting patiently, and to assure them all that we are mindful of their situations and will continue to review our position on this as time progresses.
 
We are also being asked, across the UK, Ireland, and Australia, whether junior parkrun events (2k events on Sundays for those aged 4 to 14) could reopen before the Saturday 5k events. This is something we’ve looked at closely and, whilst we wouldn’t rule anything out, it’s unlikely that this is something we would do.
 
Again, there would be many things to consider, and we understand how children are much less vulnerable to the disease, but we know that for every 100 children in attendance at junior events there are around 110 adults (volunteering, spectating, walking or running).
 
Also, in the UK for example, there are nearly 300,000 children (aged 4 to 14) registered to Saturday 5k events, who could switch to junior events, and a significant increase in participants could have a hugely detrimental effect on what is a delicate operating model responsible for safeguarding very young children.
 
Thanks, as always, for your patience, understanding, and support. We continue to monitor the situation globally, and are more confident by the day that parkrun will return across all parkrun countries.
 
We are getting through this, together.
 
Tom Williams
Chief Operating Officer
parkrun Global

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 23 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 16 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

When is a not parkrun a not parkrun?

When it’s a not-parkrun. Unless, of course, it's a (not)parkrun ..

2020-06-16 ac light
Our first ~ and last ~ bend on Tuesday afternoon, 16-06-2020

In fact a not parkrun can be either a not-parkrun or a (not)parkrun or it can be both at once. It could also be a freedom parkrun but in the interests of keeping this simple let’s just stick with not (not) and not-parkruns.

For 13 weeks now, many of us at Ashton Court parkrun (and possibly elsewhere, I’ve not looked) have been running a not-parkrun at weekends. For us, not-parkrun describes what we’ve done each weekend to replace our favourite Saturday morning activity.

Now, the boffins at parkrun Laboratries have created (not)parkrun for us all. (not)parkruns can be run on any day of the week, on any route (in other words there’s no need to use a parkrun course) and should be 5k. As with all parkruns they can be walked, skipped, trotted, jogged or even run!

When you’ve completed your (not)parkrun, go to your My Links page and tap the second button from the top. If you haven’t bookmarked your My Links page, there’s a link to it in every parkrun results email, or the email you get to thank you for volunteering.

Screenshot 2020-06-16 at 19.44.28

Having tapped the (not)parkrun key you’ll see this page:

Screenshot 2020-06-16 at 19.44.55

Choose the date, enter your time and then tap on submit. And that’s all there is to it. After a few moments the page below will have been updated.

Screenshot 2020-06-16 at 19.37.08
Of course I think this page looks rather splendid at the moment so please don't feel you need to rush to submit a time. In fact, take your time to add your time. Thank you!

You can submit a new time on every day of the week if you like, and then at the end of each week your fastest time will be included in the parkrun UK results table.

Simple! What a great idea! Have fun and please remember to do so responsibly!

parkrun UK's guide to (not)parkrun is here and there are some FAQs here which you may find helpful.

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 16 June

From Tom Williams, Chief Operating Officer, parkrun Global

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When, in March this year, we closed all our events, the symbolism of that impacted everyone in one way or another. Whilst we knew it was coming, that first Saturday without a single parkrun event anywhere in the world was a moment that most of us could never have imagined would ever happen.

Within just a few weeks, of course, many of us went from thinking parkrun will always be there, every week, for everyone, to thinking it would never come back, ever. So, as much as closing our events was a huge wake-up call that we aren’t invincible, the reopening of parkrun New Zealand is proof that we can all get through this challenge.

We’re pleased to confirm therefore, that following on from last week’s update, parkrun New Zealand will be reopening on Saturday 4 July, representing a fantastic step toward the full return of parkrun events around the world. I know it will also lift the spirits of parkrunners everywhere.

It’s important to remember though that we still have 21 parkrun countries patiently waiting for their own circumstances to improve such that their events can return. We continue to monitor the global situation, are considering our position in every single country, and will update you all every Tuesday as things move forward.

Thank you for being so patient and understanding, and, most of all, for believing in the parkrun family.

We are getting through this, together.
 
Tom Williams
Chief Operating Officer
parkrun Global

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 16 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

From Tom Williams, Chief Operating Officer, parkrun Global

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On Monday, the New Zealand Government announced that they were removing all social distancing requirements and that there would be no limits on public gatherings.

This is an incredibly positive step forward, and whilst New Zealand may seem a long way ahead of the challenges many of us continue to face, this news should give us all great hope that, in time, normal life can and will resume.

What does this mean for parkrun in New Zealand?

We have previously made two key commitments in relation to Coronavirus; firstly that all events will remain closed until at least the end of June, and secondly that we will give all event teams at least two weeks notice prior to reopening. This means that for parkrun events in New Zealand the earliest possible start date would be Saturday 4 July.

However, whilst we have continued working hard behind the scenes there are some questions we need to answer, and decisions we need to take internally, before we are able to commit to a specific date. With this news only breaking over the last few days, we also need to spend more time ensuring we fully understand the details of New Zealand’s position.

As such, we hope to confirm a reopening date for parkrun New Zealand in next week’s update.

In the meantime, and whilst we understand that in New Zealand groups are free to gather at their parkrun venues, we’d like to ask all event teams not to organise group gatherings through their parkrun communication channels. As well as insurance implications it’s important that local communities and stakeholders are aware of our return and able to accommodate us appropriately.

What does this mean for parkrun events elsewhere?

We hope this news gives parkrunners everywhere reason to be positive, and also provides reassurance that we continue to consider every parkrun country’s specific situation, and strive to do what’s right on a country by country basis.

Our position remains as it has since we first suspended our events: our overriding principle being that we will keep our events closed wherever official public health guidance recommends or requires, or where we cannot be sure that attendances will remain within set limits.

As we prepare to relaunch parkrun New Zealand, we would like to reassure the parkrun community everywhere that we will reopen in each parkrun country as soon as appropriate and safe to do so.

We are getting through this, together.
 
Tom Williams
Chief Operating Officer
parkrun Global

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 09 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

From Tom Williams, Chief Operating Officer, parkrun Global

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In last week’s update we confirmed that all parkrun events across the world will remain closed until at least this calendar month. In some parkrun countries that message was entirely expected, as they are still relatively early in their efforts to overcome the challenge presented to them by COVID-19. However, some other parkrun countries are experiencing significant relaxation of restrictions, and are beginning to approach something resembling normal life.

To reiterate previous updates, all decisions to reopen parkrun events in any specific part of the world will be taken by parkrun Global (the UK-based charity ultimately responsible for every parkrun event) in collaboration with dedicated parkrun staff or volunteers in each country. Importantly, we continue to review each parkrun country’s unique situation and are committed to reopening their events as soon as appropriate.

Further, whilst we are not at this stage ruling out changes to operations required at event level, our current position is that we will not open parkrun events in any country until we can do so across that entire country, safely and without compromising any public health guidelines in that country. We are also, at this stage, not looking to reopen events until we can do so in a way that is the same as or similar to how they operated before lockdown.

We understand the good intentions behind the many suggestions being presented around changes to how parkrun events could operate. We’ve seen ideas such as wave starts, no finish tokens, limited attendance, and enforced physical distancing between participants. However, the majority of these interventions are likely to add levels of complexity to our operating model that at best make it incredibly difficult for volunteers to deliver events, and in some cases make it impossible.

Importantly, much of our success over the last fifteen years has been due to our relentless focus on removing barriers to event delivery (as well as to event participation), and now more than ever we must keep that principle at the forefront of our minds.

We know that many people will read this update and wonder how parkrun will ever be able to return without significant changes to how it operates. However, in almost every parkrun country, the impact of COVID-19 is diminishing daily, public health guidelines are changing accordingly, and restrictions are being gradually relaxed.

Many governments have committed to a return of all sporting activities, including contact sports and those where physical distancing is not possible. Schools are returning, people are going back to work, and communities are re-engaging. All of these positive steps are steps closer to parkrun events being welcomed back into the communities they exist within, and each one provides a learning opportunity. As a result, we remain confident that, in time, all parkrun events will return.

Even more important to our success has been a focus on increased human interaction, and the utilisation of technology to enhance opportunities for people to be together, to socialise, and to share areas of open space. Again, now more than ever, it is vital that we retain our commitment to bringing people together not moving them apart.

Whilst all parkrun events remain closed this weekly update will contain all relevant information relating to the COVID-19 situation and parkrun. As we take decisions to reopen parkrun countries, relevant announcements will be made here first and from that point communications relating to the reopening of those countries will be communicated via country-specific communications channels.

Thank you for your continued support, patience, and understanding.

We are getting through this, together.

Tom Williams
Chief Operating Officer
parkrun Global

 
Links to previous updates:

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 02 June

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 26 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 19 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 12 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 05 May

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 28 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 21 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 14 April

COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Update: 07 April
 
Previous updates were posted on one page which was revised whenever necessary as the situation worsened

Current position with regard COVID-19 and implications for parkrun events

2020-05-12 covid update

 

Ashton Court parkrun’s Class of Year Seven

 

First day of the new term

Having ended Year Six with 495 finishers at our 301st event we then started Year Seven with 549 finishers, all made possible by 22 volunteer. The new year began with 386 parkrunners who were at Ashton Court parkrun for at least the 2nd time, 64 who had forgotten their barcode, and 99 who had never been here before.
 
2017-04-22 nf start

And we're off again! Event number 302 is under way, and Year Seven has begun (photo: Nigel Fletcher)
 
Of those 99, 23 were at their very 1st parkrun ~ 14 females and 9 males ~ and the remaining 76 ~ 34 females and 42 males ~ had taken part in parkruns elsewhere and were visiting us for the 1st time.
 
2017-04-22 nf first first fin

Here's Year Seven's first first timer, Aidan Noble, about to finish 4th in 17:55 (photo: Nigel Fletcher)
 
386 parkrunners ~ 172 female and 214 male ~ could have achieved a pb that morning, and almost 30% of them did, as between them 48 females and 65 males chalked up 113 personal bests. 2 parkrunners (1 of each) equalled their pbs, and 2 others (also 1 of each) missed equalling them by 1 second.

Only 1 of the 4 is a regular at Ashton Court ~ Peter Almond ~ and when he equalled his pb of 21:44 it was almost 11 months after he’d set it. Since then Peter has finished 66 more Ashton Court parkruns and the closest he’s got to his pb is 21:57. I know the feeling of time slipping away, Peter, but keep aiming high!
 
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Peter Almond charging down the hill to equal his personal best (photo: Nigel Fletcher)
 
Our wonderful volunteers

It’s only thanks to the 322 different parkrunners who volunteered a total of 1,281 times that we were able to stage our 51 parkruns in Year Seven.

They share 218 different first names, including 9 Davids, 7 Andrews, 6 Simons and 4 Emmas, 4 Janes, 4 Rachels, 4 Ruths and 4 Sarahs.
 
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Shortly before event 302 started Run Director Niall Hoskin explains how to make something work to Francesca Knapper, Julia Cook and Rachel Pinchin (photo: Nigel Fletcher)
 
New friends, new parkrunners ~ the Class of Year Seven

Year Seven saw 3,308 people ~ 1,357 female, 1,952 male ~ take part in Ashton Court parkrun for the first time. 813 had never participated in a parkrun before, and although the remaining 2,495 had, this was the 1st time they’d come to see us.

375 of these newcomers returned the following week, another 187 did so after a fortnight and 94 after 3 weeks. 507 of them waited more than 11 weeks before returning and 1,905 are still making their minds up about it.

2 of the 507 came along to our 302nd event; 1 waited 139 events before returning, the 2nd waited 140. Of course, this means they returned at our 441st and 442nd events respectively, not long before our most recent parkrun. So, Kate Whitehouse and Elaine Beckett, if you should somehow find this, please don’t let this enforced break between parkruns discourage you and come back as soon as you feel like it once we’re back in our Saturday morning routine.

Kizzy Holliday was a newcomer to our 303rd event and she waited 138 weeks to return to our 441st, having been to Clevedon Salthouse Fields parkrun the week before. Since number 441 Kizzy’s been back to the salty sea air of CSF parkrun 3 more times, and hopefully will also continue parkrunning after this unwanted break.
 
2017-04-22 nf long wait

Reasonably certain that the flyer on the right is Kate Whitehouse, who we hope to see back at parkrun when the current situation is behind us (photo: Nigel Fletcher)
 
Our Class of Year Seven consisted of 142 aged 10 or under, 235 aged between 11 and 19, 873 in their 20s, 925 in their 30s, 634 in their 40s, 381 in their 50s, 105 in their 60s, 12 in their 70s and 1 in their 80s. 46 of these had a significant birthday during the year and changed age group.

During the year all these new parkrunners completed 6,768 parkruns here at Ashton Court. 1 of them ~ Vyki Shaw ~ took part in 38 of Year Seven’s 51 events, Robin Webster and Marie Bailey both finished 35 of them, Ross Anderson 32 and Francesca Roe and Will Harris both 30.
 
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Enjoying herself at event number 336 ~ the one between Christmas and New Year ~ is Marie Bailey (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
In total there are now 27 Year Sevensters in our unofficial 50 Ashton Court parkrun club, with 3 teetering on the brink of membership on 49. Looking at the global parkrun clubs, 12 Ashton Court juniors from Year Seven have joined the junior 10 parkrun club, and 3 of them have gone on to become members of the 50 parkrun club.

59 grown-ups have also become members of the 50 club, with Vyki Shaw having been the 1st from Year Seven, and the 424th Ashton Court parkrunner overall to qualify for a red parkrun top. The most recent to qualify for membership are Callum Moore and Katrina Darke, who both did so at our 447th event and became the 694th and 695th of us from Ashton Court parkrun to join.
 
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The first Year Sevenster to join the parkrun 50 club ~ Vyki Shaw ~ looking very focussed at event 341 (photo: Suze Eyles)
 
Although there are now 4 of our Year Sevensters in the 100 parkrun club, 3 of them had already taken part in a few parkruns before their 1st run here. So the 1st, and to date sole Year Sevenster to have qualified for a black parkrun top having 1st run a parkrun here is Jenny Griggs, who achieved this goal at our 442nd parkrun and is the 314th Ashton Courter to get there!
 
2018-04-14 351 job jg

And on the left is the first ~ and only ~ Year Sevenster to have joined the parkrun 100 club ~ Jenny Griggs ~ here Tail Walking with Gill Atwill and one of our Duke of Edinburgh Award teenagers at event 351 (photo: John O'Brien)
 
1 Year Sevenster, ~ Jeremy Lowe ~ has, as I’ve said, finished 88 Ashton Court parkruns. Not having run a parkrun anywhere else, Jeremy has a 100% record. Will Harris and Robin Webster, who have both run away from home just once, have a 99% AC record, (Will with 94 out of 95, Robin 89 out of 90). And Sharon Eaves, who has run 65 of her 72 parkruns at home, has an attendance record of fractionally above 90%.
 
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Seen at event number 344 is Jeremy Lowe, keeping company with Kim Forbes (photo: Sarah Jones)
 
Leading the way for personal bests by Year Sevensters in Year Seven was Francesca Roe, who achieved 12 of them! 2 parkrunners, Chris Doonan and Brendan Boyce, both ran 10 pbs this year, and Michael Lawrence, Marie Bailey and Paul Turner each ran 9. 4 more individuals ran 8 pbs, 5 ran 7, 16 ran 6, 25 ran 5, 40 ran 4, 81 ran 3 and 184 ran 2 pbs. 456 other Year Sevensters ran 1 each, meaning that 817 members of the Class of Year Seven ran 1,574 personal bests.
 
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This is Frankie Roe at event 322, who ran with us on 30 occasions during Year Seven and achieved 12 pbs along the way (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
There were 3 Year Sevensters who finished in the same position 4 times during their 1st year; Johnny Suttle (1st), David Eagon (4th) and Edmund Willatts (6th).

5 of their classmates filled the same finish position 3 times; Andrea Jenn (231st), Robin Webster (173rd), Tony Myers (91st) and Stuart Ellis (66th). Another 77 members of the Class of Seven finished in the same place twice.
 
2017-07-01 311 rk rw

High on the hill at event 311 and Robin Webster's 3rd parkrun. Robin would finish in 25:57, and then equal that time the following Saturday. This was the 2nd of Robin's 5 pbs in Year Seven (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
2 of our Year Sevensters, Jemma Harfield and Sarah Jenkins, occupied the same gender finish position 5 times; 7th and 13th respectively.
 
2017-09-23 rk jh

Jemma Harfield is currently on 99 parkruns and is perhaps looking forward to the re-start more than most. This is event 322, 1 of the 23 of our parkruns Jemma took part in during Year Seven, and 1 of the 5 times she finished 7th female (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
7 others did so 4 times; Marie Bailey (95th), Elaine Inker (155th), David Eagon (4th), Stuart Ellis (65th), Johnny Suttle (1st), Edmund Willatts (6th) and Rosie Hattersley (1st).

Anne Dockery scored the highest age grade by a Year Sevenster during Year Seven, when she finished our 352nd event in 26:51 in 1, of her final runs in the VW65-69 category and scored 81.56%.

A month later Anne, having become a member of the VW70-74 category, finished event number 356 12 seconds faster and scored 83.55%. Clouds and silver linings!
 
2018-04-21 352 dm ad

It's quicker if you smile! And as Anne Dockery never seems to stop smiling, perhaps that's why she runs so quickly! This is event 352 and Anne's on her way to a pb of 26:51. The pb only lasted 2 parkruns and Anne's now beaten that time on 10 occasions (photo: Drew McLellan)
 
Year Seven ~ altogether now

Year Seven’s 51 parkruns were enjoyed by 5,723 different known parkrunners, who completed 21,798 parkruns during the year. Our 5,723 consisted of 3,128 females and 2,595 males.

Of the 21,798 parkruns 8,539 were completed by females, 11,002 by males and 2,257 by finishers without barcodes.

All those different parkruns were completed in 2,083 different time values, from 16:10 and 18:38 at the front end to 139:55 ~ more about the latter later.

There were 29 different female first finishers, with Amy Partridge filling that place 6 times. Chrissie Wellington, Rosie Hattersley and Kelly Dicks each finished 1st 4 times, Nicola Brookland and Jane Faram did so 3 times, and Marie Malloy, Kate Darbyshire, Sarah Everett and Alice Doggrell did so twice. Another 19 females finished 1st once.
 
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Well on her way to one of her 6 first finishes, at event 325, is Amy Partridge (photo: Dan Jones)
 
The most frequent first female finish time was 20:46, which was achieved 3 times, twice by Amy Partridge and once by Chrissie Wellington.
 
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Chrissie Wellington loves running and she loves smiling, and she's very good at both. Here Chrissie's on her way to finish 7th overall in 19:12 (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
As for the males, we saw 31 different male 1st finishers, with Jarlath McKenna and David Awde leading the way by finishing first 6 times each, Johnny Suttle and Matthew Battensby 4 times, Alex Crossland 3 times, and John Cox and Leon Rumble twice each. 24 other males finished first once each.

Swiftest of all was course record holder Jarlath McKenna, with 16:10 at event 309. 8 males beat 17 minutes 14 times overall ~ Jarlath McKenna and David Awde 4 times each, Maciej Bialogonski, Thomas Niner, Alex Crossland, Max Walker, Oliver Beale and Benjamin Tickner once each, and we timed 57 male finishes of between 17:00 and 17:59.
 
2018-02-17 344 sj tn

It's a first time first finish for Thomas Niner, on his only visit to Ashton Court, at parkrun number 344 (photo: Sarah Jones)
 
2 females beat 19 minutes ~ Nicola Brookland 3 times and Chrissie Wellington once. Rosie Hattersley (4 times); Chrissie Wellington (2); Emma Pooley, Evita Gonzalez Szamocki, Katrine Louise Svane, Kelly Dicks and Olivia Sadler (once each) all finished in times between 19:00 and 19:59.
 
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This was Emma Pooley's 1st ever parkrun and she finished 6th overall, in 19:10, at event 346. Her time is the 13th fastest recorded by a female at Ashton Court (photo: Geoff Keogh)
 
Year Seven’s fastest first-timers are all mentioned above; Thomas with 16:35 at event 344 and Max at event 352 with 16;42, and Olympic cycling medal winner Emma (19:10 at event 346) and Katrine Louise (19:16 at event 306).
 
2017-05-20 306 dm kls

Making this running lark look very easy ~ which of course, it ought to be ~ is Katrine Louise Svane, on her way to finishing first female on her first(and only) run with us. Katrine's time of 19:16 is the 19th fastest of all our female finish times (photo: Drew McLellan)
 
The average finish time in Year Seven was 28:48, the median was 27.53 and the time we recorded most often was 24:45, on 36 occasions!

Desmond Jones, Alex Williams and Paul Hodges each finished in 24:45 twice, and there 7 parkruns when 2 finishers recorded this particular time.
 
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Here's one of our Run Directors Paul Hodges, on the way to one of his two 24:45 finishes, this one at event 345 (photo: Sarah Jones)
 
Eliot Hames, Robin Webster and Ross Anderson each finished in the same time 3 times; respectively 19:06, 25:43 and 25:48, but of those 3 only Ross scored the same age grade 3 times ~ 53.68%, with Tim Constable matching Ross’s achievement with 3 scores of 58.34%.
 
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One of the Class of Year Seven is Ross Anderson, at event 309. Ross would go on to finish events 342, 344 and 345 all in the same time of 25:48, with a blip of 27:29 at event 343 (photo: John O'Brien)
 
782 females and 1,005 males ~ 1,787 parkrunners ~ achieved 3,131 pbs in Year Seven ~ 1,361 by females and 1,770 by males.

The most pbs achieved this year was 14, by Naina Burgess who during Year Seven sped up from 38:35 to 27:28.
 
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A 13th pb in Year Seven wasn't at all unlucky for Naina Burgess ~ here leading the pack on her way to 27:40 at event 342 ~ as 2 parkruns later Naina beat that time by 14 seconds for pb number 14 (photo: Dan Jones)
 
Francesca Roe, as we know, ran 12 pbs, starting at 31:25 and working her way down to 25:04. Then came Graham Grew, whose 11 pbs brought his best down from 25:54 to 23:48. Chris Doonan lowered his best from 25:05 to 20:21 with 10 pbs on the way, and one of our juniors, Brendan Boyce, who took his best from 25:36 to 21:05, again with 10 pbs.

5 parkrunners ran 9 pbs, 7 achieved 8, another 7 achieved 7, 27 ran 6, 42 ran 5, 69 ran 4, 141 ran 3, 369 ran 2 and 1,138 each ran 1 personal best during Year Seven.
 
2018-04-21 352 dm gg
Enjoying the sunshine at event 352 is Graham Grew (photo: Drew McLellan)
 
327 parkrunners finished in the same position twice, 43 did so 3 times, 15 on 4 occasions, and Simon Cardnell finished 2nd 5 times, with Jarlath McKenna and David Awde both finishing 1st 6 times.

Marie Malloy finished 64th on 4 occasions, the same number of times that Christine Burren finished 186th.
 
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This is event 345, the 25th of the 30 parkruns that Year Sevenster Will Harris completed this year (photo: Sarah Jones)
 
Moving on to gender finish position, 4 parkrunners finished in the same place 6 times. Jarlath McKenna, David Awde and Amy Partridge each finished 1st half a dozen times, and one of our juniors, Lottie Livesey, finished 5th female 6 times.

8 of us filled the same gender position 5 times, 30 did so 4 times, 91 on 3 occasions, and 390 of us did so twice.
 
2017-06-17 309 job cb

Ashton Court parkrunner number 34 is Christine Burren, and here is Chris at event 309, about to finish 186th for the 2nd time in 3 parkruns. Chris occupied this finish position at events 302, 309, 320 and 344 (photo: John O'Brien)
 
Year Seven was the year when we timed our 14,000th, 15,000th and 16,000th finishers over the line, as well as our 7,000th different female, and 8,000th and 9,000th different males.

The 14,000th new finisher was a junior who had take part twice at Pomphrey Hill parkrun before coming here for this 1 event and has yet to take part in a 4th parkrun. Plenty of time for that though . For number 15,000, this was their 18th parkrun, they ran here twice more and have now completed 145 events.Number 16,000 has only taken part here that 1 time. This was their 22nd parkrun, and now they’ve finished 53 of them, with 51 having been at Burnham and Highbridge parkrun

Their 1st visit here was our 7,000th female parkrunner’s only parkrun so far. Our 8,000th male had run 44 parkruns before coming along to Ashton Court and now has a total of 52 events, with just that 1 visit to Ashton Court on his CV. The 9,000th different male across our finish line had run 4 parkruns elsewhere before visiting us for the 1st time. He’s now taken part in 63 parkruns ~ including 4 here and 55 at Eastville parkrun
 
During Year Seven we introduced ourselves to 58 new Jameses, 57 new Sarahs, 55 new Davids, 41 Matthews, 40 Andrews and 40 Toms, and 30 Helens, 28 Rebeccas and 25 Rachels and 25 Emmas.

There were also 29 new Joneses (15 female, 14 male), 25 Smiths (7 and 18), 22 Williamses (7 and 15), 21 Taylors (11 and 10) and 15 Davieses (7 and 8) and 15 Browns (4 and 11).
 
2017-11-04 328 rk st

This is Sarah Taylor at event 328, on her 1st parkrun here. Sarah is the 215th Sarah (out of 318 so far), and the 98th Taylor (out of 143 Taylors so far. && Taylors have been female, 67 male). Sarah was also the 1st of the 3 Sarah Taylors who have participated here so far (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
Year Seven ~ a Bigger Picture

We had a “more special than most” parkrun on the 2nd of December in 2017 at our 332nd event. I mentioned earlier that we’d timed someone ~ 2 finishers in fact ~ over the line in 139:55. Here’s how we described it in the weekend’s parkrun report:

“And, of course, we had Lenny Brown with us. A friend of hers, Tom Feilding, is a regular AC parkrunner and he told us of Lenny's ambition to take part in a parkrun. Today that ambition was realised, and it was a privilege for us all to be part of it. It was Lenny who did the hard work, of course, and Lenny - you're a star!“
 
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The pictures alone don't tell the story ~ Lenny Brown's parkrun (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
At the end of that month we saw both 1st finishers with the same 1st name, the only time that’s happened here. It was event number 336, and Alex Crossland finished first overall in 17:41, and Alex Binley crossed the line in 20th position with the time of 21:27 to finish 1st female.
 
2017-12-30 rk ac ab

Thanks to Photoshop, here are event 336's 2 first finishers, Alex Crossland and Alex Bingley (photos: Rich Kenington)
 
Having begun Year Seven with 549 finishers we ended with 454. In between our attendances varied from a low of 275 to a high of 593. We saw 446 finishers on 4 occasions during the year, the average attendance was 427 and the median was 432, which we achieved at event number 308.

We also had our 6th groundhog Saturday during Year Seven, when we saw the same number of finishers at 2 consecutive parkruns ~ 348 at both number 310 and 311.

Once again, we “lost” 3 Saturdays when Ashton Court was either unavailable or inaccessible. Let’s Rock Bristol was again the 1st, on June 3rd, followed by all the hot air that accompanies the Balloon Fiesta on August 12th. And then, just when we probably thought we’d got away with it for the winter, down came the snow and we were off again on March 3rd 2018.
 
2018-03-17 rk snow

No need to call event 347 off, it's only a blizzard! Tail Walker David Braithwaite accompanies Jo Coburn and Diane Javoric towards the finish line, with an unidentified course marshal (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
This year it was 3 parkruns in 3 days

With the New Year starting on a Monday we were able to have our regular Saturday parkrun on 30th December 2017, have a breather on Sunday and then go again on New Year’s Day. There was less choice this time, with only us and Pomphrey Hill parkrun taking place on the holiday. Having seen 356 finishers on Saturday, started again at 09.00 2 days later, with 446 finishers, and a little over 90 minutes later, 637 set off around Pomphrey Hill’s 3 laps.

Remarkably, only 29 of the morning’s finishers didn’t have a barcode scanned ~ 11 here and 18 at Pomphrey Hill parkrun. The remaining 1,054 finish positions were filled by 798 different parkrunners, with 256 having taken part in both the 1st 2 Monday parkruns in the neighbourhood.
 
New Neighbours
 
Speaking of which, our Year Seven was a big year for parkrun in the area around Bristol, because on 18th November 2017 both Eastville and Thornbury parkruns went live. It could be said that Eastville parkrun was Bristol’s 1st parkrun event, given that our course is physically in North Somerset, while Thornbury parkrun became the 3rd event in South Gloucestershire. Both 1st events were crowded, with 679 finishers (more than we’d ever seen) at Eastville parkrun and another 337 at Thornbury parkrun.
 
2017-11-18 001 rk evl

The very pretty bit at Eastville parkrun, where the less fast parkrunners can look down at the slightly faster ones on their circuit of the lake. This was at Eastville parkrun's 1st event (photo: Rich Kenington)
 
Looking around that day, our attendance was 76 down on the previous week. Chipping Sodbury parkrun saw 43 fewer finishers, Pomphrey Hill parkrun were down by precisely 100, and Bath Skyline by 44. So that’s 263, plus the 88 brand-new parkrunners at Eastville and the 108 at Thornbury. There’s 459 of the finishers at the 2 new events. Where did the remaining 557 emerge from? We may never know!
 
It’s been great fun having these 2 extra neighbours, in particular the teasing about who has the worst hill. Clearly that’s not us, because we have the “best” hill, it’s in the middle of the course and half of it goes down!

Having seen our annual number of finishers increase by 4,788 in Year Five, and a further 4,358 in Year Six, with parkrunners in the area now having a greater choice of where to take their barcode on a Saturday morning, our Seventh Year was one of consolidation, and we did well to increase our finisher numbers by 583. What would Year Eight bring?
 
2018-04-21 352 dm finish

Almost the end of Year Seven, as the finish funnel volunteers wait for the final handful of event number 352's participants (photo: Drew McLellan)
 

Report by Rich Kenington, Ashton Court parkrunner number 1,817
 

Coming sometime in the next fortnight .. Year Eight

 

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