Banstead Woods parkrun Runner of the Year 2018-19

Each year, as part of our Annual Anniversary celebration, we will award the Anne Roden 'Runner of the Year' trophy to the male and female runner who has, in the opinion of participants at Banstead Woods parkrun, deserved this accolade.

This year, our Anniversary event takes place on Saturday 15th June 2019. The Co-Directors would like to invite you to vote for your choice of male and/or female Runners of the Year.The criteria you use is entirely up to you but, we respectfully ask that you only vote once.

Please note that you will need to enter a valid email address and your parkrun ID.

Please click on this link to cast your votes

Voting closes at midnight on Wednesday 12th June.

 

Lift Someone up

Banstead Woods Report for Event 626 – 18th May 2019

Report by Dave Boland               Photos by Cameron Hale

Link to this week’s photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bwp_photographs/albums/72157691493368993

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I have recently become a little PB obsessed at Banstead. I am always pleased to run a PB but it seems lately like that is what my outing in the woods has become to me, with disappointment even beginning to register when I do not set one. This is not why I signed up for parkrun – I do it for my health, enjoyment and to set a good example for my kids. I thought this morning of something Linda O’Sullivan said to me before I wrote my first run report “Remember it’s a run not a race” and this encapsulates the parkrun ethos perfectly.

Last week and again this week my eldest woodland explorer (Oisín aged 3 ¾) joined me for (almost) the first lap of the course. It is a very different experience. I was approached by our tail walkers – how long did I think it would take? should they walk with me? (I assured them I would gun for it on lap 2 to assuage their concerns). My boy points out things in the woods I would not otherwise notice – a stick here, a Gruffalo or dragon there – a cool tree and our perambulations are punctuated with frequent pauses for poking. Usually he is the one to “cheer up” (he cannot say cheer on!) the runners but I found that the support and encouragement offered to us (and especially him) by those running past was a wonderful opportunity to see the positive atmosphere of parkrun at it’s finest.

I myself have had fellow parkrunners help me to PB’s, have seen the encouragement offered to people on the hill, the number of runners who stop at the first sign of anyone limping or walking – it is the perfect tonic to the sometimes tumultuous times we now live in. The peace of the woods, the community spirit and the lifting up of each other is what makes (and will keep) parkrun special.

While our daddy and son parkruns may have to be moved to one of the junior parkruns on a Sunday morning as this course is a little difficult for him just yet, it did remind me of the good example I can set for him and my younger boy. No plopping them in front of the TV or computer games on a Saturday morning we get out for some fresh air.

The volunteer team – ably led by our intrepid Run Director Elliott was fantastic as usual (I definitely had a laugh at the milestones not turning up!!). I strongly encourage everyone to volunteer at least one time and see the organisation that goes into these events – it’s impressive!

Volunteering is a great way to lift people up, share the workload and ensure our fantastic woodland runs continue for Oisín’s 500th parkrun!

I am deliberately not mentioning our “winners” or PB’s this week (sorry all I am sure normal service will resume next week). I am in a philosophical frame of mind and note that there are no t-shirts at parkrun for PB’s or placings. There are, however, definitely t-shirts for our milestone runners (at least when they turn up eh Elliott?). This week we had Steven Billing become eligible for his red 50 milestone shirt and a couple of did not shows! I would also like to give a special mention to Mark Thompson for his incredible 450th parkrun last week as I think it was missed out (he even showed up for his 451st this week).

In a different type of milestone my wonderful wife celebrated her birthday this morning in the woods with us (Happy birthday Mhairi!). I think she should get some sort of “facilitation” milestone t-shirt for attending every parkrun with me and watching the munchkins while I run.

With all of this being said PB’s are still important to measure your progression and I will be back shooting for one next week having had my little helper the last couple of weeks so here are the motivational statistics:

This week 193 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 22 were first timers and 39 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 24 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 20 volunteers:

Chris PHELAN • Jo QUANTRILL • Therese PANETTA • Sue ESSLEMONT • Anne RODEN • Gill STALLEY • Heather FENTON • Phil FENTON • Nicholas FOSTER • Trevor MEADOWCROFT • Elliott BURTON • Tony SAILL • Kevan BROWNING • Steve HILL • Thomas JARRETT • Nick BILLING • Natalie LAING • David BOLAND • Cameron HALE • Kim BARKER

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Banstead Woods parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Kevin QUINN who recorded a time of 15:25 on 7th June 2008 (event number 54). The female record is held by Natalie HARVEY who recorded a time of 17:01 on 30th July 2011 (event number 216). The Age Grade course record is held by Clare ELMS who recorded 89.66% (18:42) on 26th April 2014 (event number 361).

Banstead Woods parkrun started on 16th June 2007. Since then 10,507 participants have completed 100,344 parkruns covering a total distance of 501,720 km, including 15,893 new Personal Bests. A total of 468 individuals have volunteered 11,113 times.

Event Reporter: Dave Boland

 

The Pearl in the Oyster

Banstead Woods Report for Event 625 – 11th May 2019

Report by Kevan Browning               Photos by Gill Stalley

Link to this week’s photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bwp_photographs/albums/72157707039738881

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I have a theory that many people at our event have never seen the very best moment of the Banstead Woods parkrun. I’ll explain. But first………

When I was a boy I lived for a time with my Great Grandad, who had survived the whole of World War 1, including the Somme, and also my Grandad, who survived World War 2, including Dunkirk and Normandy. Anyway, aged about 9, they both gave me two words of advice for life. “Never volunteer”. Fortunately volunteering at parkrun doesn’t involve the jeopardy associated with the events to which they were referring, so I’m sure they’d exempt parkrun volunteering.

I’d run about 60 times before I volunteered the first time and genuinely thought before doing so (forced out of running by an injury) that parkrun was all about running (the clue is in the name, I thought). But, in fact, it’s much more than that. It’s about a collegiate community. Volunteering, for me, has always been at least as much fun as running and you’re missing out if you haven’t yet done it.

When you volunteer at Banstead Woods you get to see the bit I think is the best moment. Where the crowd has gathered in a cacophony of exchanged greetings and comments on the forecast performances for this day, accompanied by a constant and strident percussion of barks, the Run Director will (eventually!) give the command to “go!” And then the fast will sprint away, the quick run off, the slow jog, the dog owners amble, the walkers trudge and the late starters appear from the bottom of the hill (“how far behind am I?”) and then they too will move away in pursuit. What is left is a beautiful and near complete stillness and silence, with only the occasion faint rustle of wind in upward branches.

Missing that moment of golden silence after the start today were 264 runners and walkers which included 34 first timers at Banstead Woods, among which were 5 genuine first timers anywhere. 34 of the starters were to go on to a pb.

Missing the moment quickest were first finisher Simon Booth (18.19), second David Freeman (18.22) and third Simon Ford (18.38). First female was Lisa Rooney in a speedy 18.59 (the closest I have ever got to Lisa was standing next to her on the commute from London), second Mary James (19.36) and third Alice Smith (21.50).

Official milestones which warrant a parkrun t shirt were recorded by Vera Simms (50), Edit Kokavecz (100) and Kerena Ivens (250).

Unofficial milestones too for Steve Arnold (150), Robin Holmes (350), Mark Thompson (450), and Neil Sunderland (650) – Neil now only 350 from his 1,000.

Herewith the stats:

This week 264 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 34 were first timers and 32 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 33 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 19 volunteers:

Therese PANETTA • Alan MATTHEWS • Mary MATTHEWS • Tony POYSER • Andy ZONFRILLO • Mark THOMPSON • Waller PAUL • Gill STALLEY • Malcolm MATTHEWS • Kevin LEWIS • Oliver ZONFRILLO • Judith WHEELER • Nick CAREW-GIBBS • Elliott BURTON • Kevan BROWNING • Steve HILL • Kieran LEWIS • Thomas JARRETT • Natalie LAING

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Banstead Woods parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Kevin QUINN who recorded a time of 15:25 on 7th June 2008 (event number 54).
The female record is held by Natalie HARVEY who recorded a time of 17:01 on 30th July 2011 (event number 216).
The Age Grade course record is held by Clare ELMS who recorded 89.66% (18:42) on 26th April 2014 (event number 361).

Banstead Woods parkrun started on 16th June 2007. Since then 10,485 participants have completed 100,151 parkruns covering a total distance of 500,755 km, including 15,854 new Personal Bests. A total of 468 individuals have volunteered 11,092 times.

Event Reporter: Kevan Browning

 

“Last Confirmation Officer”

Banstead Woods Report for Event 624 – May 4th 2019

Report by Alison Cattermole                    Photos by Jennifer Child

Link to this weeks Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bwp_photographs/albums/72157691274058493

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I am always struck by the people I meet at parkrun and especially by their individual stories. I suppose I am a bit of a nosey parker, but everyone has their own history and it is a privilege to hear about them either while tail walking, hanging around at the start/finish or engaging people in conversation as bar-code scanner or another volunteer position. And sometimes even while running!

This week I was actually running (rather than volunteering) and, despite the unexpected cold, I was accompanied part of the way by a phalanx of very young children. How lovely to see them out in the fresh air enjoying spending time in the woods with their parents and getting exercise. I also ran past a runner with a buggy containing a tiny baby. As I passed, I asked if it was the baby’s first parkrun. No, came the reply, her 10th. How brilliant – for both baby and runner! I spent the second lap chatting to a BWp first timer, a tourist from Riddlesdown who was running with her sons and came to see the bluebells. We chatted about holidays and work and running in our 60s and how good it made us feel even though we weren’t natural runners. I guess if we hadn’t been talking I might have achieved a faster time, but the companionship made it a most pleasurable parkrun.

Last week was no exception in terms of hearing people’s stories. I was tail walking and (having waited at the start for a few minutes for any late comers) I had to run to catch up with three ladies who were at the back of the pack. Having confirmed that they actually were doing parkrun we started to chat as we walked and I learned that one of their number would be dropping out after the first circuit. She had recently finished a course of radiotherapy for cancer and this was her first major outing. One circuit would be plenty. I was impressed that she was there at all but also rather thrilled to be able to tell her about Alan Collis’s bench, recently installed with much celebration near the finish funnel, where she would be able to sit and wait for her friends to join her after they had completed their second lap.

Turning to speak with one of the other ladies, a veteran of over 190 parkruns, but only an occasional visitor to BWp, she said that she was running the London Marathon for the second time the next day and this was a warm up. Wow, I thought, a real marathon runner. Respect! She also told me that she had been on holiday to Japan recently and, as luck would have it, a parkrun had just started in Tokyo and she was able to take part in the 2ndevent with her teenage son. She noticed that they had no tail walker and, as she would still be in Tokyo the next week, she gallantly volunteered for the position. That’s taking parkrun tourism to a completely new level. Good on you!

I have been reading Debra Bourne’s 2014 book, Much More Than Just a Run in the Park, about the early days of parkrun. If you haven’t read it, you should, its full of interesting facts and information and not a little about the start of our own BWp (the 3rd one ever) with words of wisdom from our beloved leader Chris Phelan and a number of our other regular and stalwart volunteers. In it, Debra recounts how tricky it was starting up parkrun events in other countries because of the difficulties of translating parkrun rules and regulations, operating manuals and general best practice into another language. She mentioned particular problems in Poland and Russia, although it seems not to have hindered the success of either of these in the end. However, Japan must have been a step even further, with its Chinese characters and cultural nuances. My tail walking companion told me how words were translated from English into Japanese but that if you then translated them back to English you got some very interesting results. For instance, tail walker translated back into Last Confirmation Officer. So that was my volunteer position this week – Last Confirmation Officer, hence the title of this report!

The London Marathon is always wonderful spectacle and this year was no exception. I watch on TV and am always inspired by the elite athletes, the committed club runners looking for PBs, people raising money for various good causes and those running just because (like Everest) it’s there. Then there are the people who run in fancy dress – as a postman, as Big Ben or a smurf.  It’s hard enough running 26 miles in shorts and a singlet, but to do it encased in cardboard or foam and in a time of less than 4 hours is just mind-bogglingly amazing. And somewhere in the 40,000 odd competitors this year was someone who raised the £1000,0000,0000 at the London marathon. I heard about one charity called Whizz Kidz that started at the London Marathon, with the founder running to raise money to buy a specialist wheel chair for one particular child. They raised so much money that they were able to buy several wheelchairs for different children and the next year they did it again. To date Whizz Kidz has raised millions of pounds and helped hundreds of children get mobile. And it all started with the London Marathon. How amazing is that?

My last parkrun report was about the Boston Marathon of which the inaugural event in 1897was the first annual marathon. Incredibly, the first London Marathon wasn’t held until 1981. Yes, it does feel as if its been going for ever, but next year will be the 40th anniversary.

The history of the marathon is an interesting one. Contrary to popular belief, it was never an event in Ancient Greece but Michel Brael, the Frenchman who invented the modern marathon, was inspired by Greek mythology. 17 runners lined up for the first Olympic marathon in 1896 running from Marathon to the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens, a distance of 40 kms. That first race provided much drama and its success cemented the marathon as a blue riband event in the Olympics. For much of its history the marathon has been very much an elite sport and it was only in the 1980s that it became the mass participation sport it is today. The first New York marathon in 1970 (which sparked the trend for marathons in major cities around the globe)had 127 entrants, by 1979 this had grown to 11,500 and by 2015 there were 50,000. British athlete Chris Brasher, famous for being one of Roger Bannister’s pacemakers (the other was Chris Chattaway), when he ran the first sub 4-minute mile, took part in the 1979 NY marathon and was inspired to start the London marathon with John Disley.7,055 runners took part the first year; this year’s event fielded over 40,000 participants, the highest ever. The rest, as they say, is history!

Everyone says London is the best marathon in the world, but I suppose we would say that because we are British. I know there were a number of runners from BWp this year, as in any year, and we provided several volunteers too. It’s all over now, so well done to all of you – you are a credit to parkrun and an inspiration to everyone whether we run or not. A special mention for Rachel Saunders who not only ran the marathon last week but also ran her 200th parkrun today. And in case you are wondering, my tail walking companion finished in very creditable time which I think she would have been pleased with. A tad longer than Sir Mo, but she did finish, and for that she has my deepest admiration.

And here is my inspirational quote of the week, from the American motivational speaker and writer, Zig Ziglar (awesome name!):

Success means doing the best we can with what we have. Success is the doing, not the getting; in the trying, not the triumph. Success is a personal standard, reaching for the highest that is in us, becoming all that we can be.”

My tail walking companion may not be in the elite category or even in the ‘dressed as a post-box’ category, but she DID the marathon, she strove to be the best she could be on the day. And that is as great a success for her as the incredible time of 2hours 2 minutes and 37 seconds of Eliud Kipchoge, who won for the 4th time in succession.

All I could manage last week was 5km in just over an hour, coming in at number 303 – though, come to think of it, that is a BWp parkrun record. So, good for me, that’s the only record I am ever to break!

Enjoy the bank holiday and the rest of the week, but wrap up warm – it’s going to be a chilly one!


Herewith the stats from today’s event:

This week 282 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 33 were first timers and 49 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 33 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 20 volunteers:

Patricia CUE • Therese PANETTA • Sue ESSLEMONT • Don ESSLEMONT • Anne RODEN • Anita HEDGES • Mark THOMPSON • Waller PAUL • David MORRIS • Nicholas FOSTER • Jennifer CHILD • Mick CHILD • Trevor MEADOWCROFT • Kerena IVENS • Elliott BURTON • Thomas JARRETT • Nick BILLING • Alison CATTERMOLE • Mike CUE • Moray LAING

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Banstead Woods parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Kevin QUINN who recorded a time of 15:25 on 7th June 2008 (event number 54).
The female record is held by Natalie HARVEY who recorded a time of 17:01 on 30th July 2011 (event number 216).
The Age Grade course record is held by Clare ELMS who recorded 89.66% (18:42) on 26th April 2014 (event number 361).

Banstead Woods parkrun started on 16th June 2007. Since then 10,451 participants have completed 99,887 parkruns covering a total distance of 499,435 km, including 15,822 new Personal Bests. A total of 467 individuals have volunteered 11,073 times.

 

Event Reporter   Alison Cattermole

 

 

Do I Get a Red One for This?

Banstead Woods Report for Event 623 - 27th April 2019

Report by Trevor Meadowcroft              Photos by Kelly Marie Mason

Link to this week’s photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bwp_photographs/albums/72157691143037653

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With the BWp attendance record broken it seemed appropriate that this should be a report of numbers. If I was suffering with OCD they would be arranged in some form of numerical order but they will just come tumbling out as I recall or notice them.

303 people completed BWp today. This beat the previous record by ten. Often the question is “why were the numbers down”, but this time it was a different question - “why were they up?” with no ready explanation. It certainly wasn’t the weather. I can only assume last week was our Summer. New Year resolutions have long gone. With the London Marathon numbers are normally reduced with the people saving themselves for the task ahead. Kids are back to school.

5 The number of palpations suffered by the disc distributors when they realised that the 300 numbers were going to be used for the first time.

160 This is the number of Bluebell bulbs per square meter that are required to give a good covering. They were certainly looking at their best today. Could this be the reason the numbers are up? At least one local running club have an annual trip just to see the blue Hyacinthoides in bloom.

7 The number of people for whom this was their First parkrun. A good number and welcome to you all.

63 The number of parkrun tourists that visited BWp for the first time today. I have had a look through my reports and I certainly cannot recall so many and this is probably the reason that we broke our attendance record. Many seemed to be local visitors but we did have some from further afield such as Exeter, Horsham and Alice Holt.

43mph Average Wind speed. Normally we hardly notice the wind as we make our way around the course thankful for the shielding effect of the trees but today was an exception and as always is the case you only ever notice the impact when it is working against you.

51st excuse used for not getting a pb - many thanks to the wind for supplying a perfectly feasible explanation.

45 was the number of Pb’s this week a healthy number bearing in mind conditions were not ideal. On looking through most of these were either returning tourists or parkrun newbies. A call out to Sophie Lomas who set a new pb on her 38th BWp.

3 members of the 500 club graced us with their presence this week. We had our regulars Neil Sutherland and Patricia Cue but also Suzan Baker who is a Bushy Park regular.

4 Milestones were achieved today. Young Charlotte Lawton completed her 10th, Mary Harte Jones her 150th, Lawrence Learner his 200th and Jo Newstead her 300th. Congratulations to you all.

17 Volunteers were on duty today. I was fortunate to be signposting with Nick Foster who is generally accepted as the Doyen of BWp signposting. He sets standards that for the rest of us can only be aspirational. It’s the little things such as setting the signs lower with a branch in front to counteract the wind. It’s these that set him apart. Some of the “slapdash merchants” could learn so much.

4 is the number of times that Alex Penfold has been the given the first token. He was followed soon afterwards by Kevin Lewis with Daniel Wolffe not far behind.

1 is the number of times that Alice Tozer has visited BWp.

1 is the number of times that Alice Tozer has been the first women home. She was followed in soon after by Sophie Lomas and Laura Palmer was third women home, also setting a pb in the process.

50 is the number of times that I have now written the BWp report. I was tempted to use my first one and see if anybody noticed. The worrying thing is that probably nobody would have noticed or made some comment about it “not being as good as his earlier stuff’. Will now wait for my red shirt. I am not holding my breath.

Statistics:

This week 303 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 70 were first timers and 45 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 43 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 17 volunteers:

Sue MCINTYRE • Tim MCINTYRE • Therese PANETTA • James CARTWRIGHT • Andrew STALLEY • David FREEMAN • Waller PAUL • Gill STALLEY • Kelly Marie MASON • Nicholas FOSTER • Ian JOHNSON • Trevor MEADOWCROFT • Elliott BURTON • Usha STEVENS • Nick BILLING • Alison CATTERMOLE • Natalie LAING

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Banstead Woods parkrun Results Page.

The male record is held by Kevin QUINN who recorded a time of 15:25 on 7th June 2008 (event number 54).

The female record is held by Natalie HARVEY who recorded a time of 17:01 on 30th July 2011 (event number 216).

The Age Grade course record is held by Clare ELMS who recorded 89.66% (18:42) on 26th April 2014 (event number 361).

Banstead Woods parkrun started on 16th June 2007. Since then 10,418 participants have completed 99,605 parkruns covering a total distance of 498,025 km, including 15,773 new Personal Bests. A total of 466 individuals have volunteered 11,053 times.

Event Reporter: Trevor Meadowcroft

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