Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham is cancelled on 18 July 2020: COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

Event #483

This week 629 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 67 were first timers and 105 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 56 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 51 volunteers:

Martin FOSTER • Barrie Moelwyn Antony ROBERTS • David CHAPMAN • Clive ROSE • Keith EVANS • Afshin BEMANI • Khatma BIBI • Janet SMITH • Sylvia HUGHES • Keira VALENTINE • Thomas STOKES • Geoffrey HUGHES • Harry ALVAREZ • James POWIS • Rafal DUDZIAK • Lee J GREGORY • Neil BROWN • Jon WILLIAMSON • Peter HICKMAN • Ron CATTLE • Emma CARTWRIGHT • Issy RAVENHILL • Chipo MANIKA • Austin BARBER • Marion PAVITT • Emily SHEPHERD • Scott BROUGH • Harriet COLLINGE • Anna MCMANUS • Ieuan DARKES • Ciaran TURNBULL • Elizabeth WHITWORTH • Ian SWAIN • Umar HASSAN • Hannah BLAKEY • Paul RUSSELL • Timothy HONG • Michael RAVENHILL • Dale MOGG • Tom DOWNES • Christina HADDON • Jane GILL • Navneet PHULL • Joe FARRAR • Stuart FREETH • Oliver KIERNAN • George DUNSTAN • Jeannie BIRKETT • Sarah WALLER • Chris ALLEN • Katey ANDERSON

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham Results Page.

The female record is held by Hayley CARRUTHERS who recorded a time of 16:21 on 16th March 2019 (event number 433).
The male record is held by Omer AHMED who recorded a time of 14:38 on 15th June 2019 (event number 446).
The Age Grade course record is held by Tony WRIGHT who recorded 91.83% (16:19) on 26th January 2019 (event number 426).

Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham started on 28th August 2010. Since then 26,018 participants have completed 228,571 parkruns covering a total distance of 1,142,855 km, including 36,556 new Personal Bests. A total of 2,001 individuals have volunteered 14,449 times.

 

Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham Event number 479 8th February 2020

Cannon Hill parkrun report - Saturday 8 February 2020

7.30am - Barcode check, sat nat check and off I set - today had been in the calendar for a few months now as fellow Run Mummy Run Anna McManus was due to run her 100th parkrun. I’d been wanting to come across and visit for a while now but travelling from Telford and navigating the M6 and spaghetti junction had put me off.

I arrived in good time, probably a little early, parking ticket purchased and followed my nose (well Lycra clad runner) into the park. I’d ran through here before whilst doing the Birmingham Half Marathon and having only touched the edge of the park was excited to be running the parkrun course - a new recent change to the route too.

I’d heard Cannon Hill was a popular one and regular attendance can be between 800-1000 runners so couldn’t wait to enjoy the atmosphere that waited. I did a gentle warm up mile and noticed the high vis volunteers by the bandstand so knew where to head. Checked in and made myself known to the Run Director and waited then for my other running buddies to arrive.

The feel at Cannon Hill was different as each course is. I’d put today’s into a very well oiled parkrun category. Never before have I seen volunteers queue on arrival - obviously with running numbers there is a lot of support required to allow us to get our weekly running fix.

I really enjoyed my run this morning, I thanked every Marshall as I went past them and took the run a little easier than normal but all worked out well as I reserved some energy for the killer hill at the end lol

I crossed the finish line, and thought the finish funnel worked really well and again well organised back down to the path and took my token - 661. Many volunteers again ready to scan my barcode and token.

I then supported with sorting the tokens in the cafe - bit overwhelming with over 800 tokens but many hands made light work of the task ahead and I enjoyed chatting to two university students as we sorted.

A fab parkrun, my 177th run and volunteered too giving a little something back in return. Thank you Cannon Hill. Marie Mason

This week 863 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 92 were first timers and 133 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 46 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 58 volunteers:

Martin FOSTER • Mary ROSS • Alex SEABRIGHT • David CHAPMAN • Graham LAWRENCE • Keith EVANS • John SUFFIELD • Sylvia HUGHES • Keira VALENTINE • Andrew PAUL • Lisa BLISSITT • Geoffrey HUGHES • Ben CLARKE • Rosina ORTON • Harry ALVAREZ • Mark WITHERIDGE • Adrian O'LEARY • Rachel BROWN • Neil BROWN • Toby HORWOOD • Richard HARTIGAN • Barry WILLIAMS • Debbie RINGHAM • Ron CATTLE • Marie MASON • Richard WILKES • Sam ROBINSON • Issy RAVENHILL • Nick KTORI • Simon BROCK • Emily SHEPHERD • Scott BROUGH • Harriet COLLINGE • Alex WILSON • Kate NICHOLS • Robert SAUNDERS • Natalie GRAY • Anna MCMANUS • Ieuan DARKES • Alex GROVES • Lottie STONE • Debra LEES • Robert MCMANUS • Ceri ARMSTRONG • Sam GARDINER • Neil GREGORY • James OSBORN • Michael RAVENHILL • Corrie MARTIN • Jill SANSUM • Katie BRITNELL • Vasileios LYKOUDIS • Navneet PHULL • Ken NICHOLS • Helen NICHOLS • George DUNSTAN • Jeannie BIRKETT • Flora GREGORY

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham Results Page.

The female record is held by Hayley CARRUTHERS who recorded a time of 16:21 on 16th March 2019 (event number 433).
The male record is held by Omer AHMED who recorded a time of 14:38 on 15th June 2019 (event number 446).
The Age Grade course record is held by Tony WRIGHT who recorded 91.83% (16:19) on 26th January 2019 (event number 426).

Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham started on 28th August 2010. Since then 25,681 participants have completed 225,476 parkruns covering a total distance of 1,127,380 km, including 36,157 new Personal Bests. A total of 1,967 individuals have volunteered 14,259 times.

 

 

So… parkrun? How does it work?

(Thanks to Hove Promenade parkrun for the original text which they’ve kindly allowed us to adapt for our own use)

Since Cannon Hill parkrun first started in August 2010, we've grown from strength to strength, and are now seeing regular turnouts of between 800 and 1000 runners, joggers and walkers.

With so many new people now joining us on a Saturday morning, we thought we'd put together some information about our event - why we ask you to do what we do, explain a little bit of the terminology and help you understand a bit of how everything works.

Firstly, everyone is a volunteer; we try to be as professional as we can be, but please do bear this in mind if the results are late, or there are no photos on the Facebook page yet. Having said that, we volunteer because we love it - it's fun, engaging and you can learn new skills in a warm and welcoming environment. It's not a closed club and anyone is welcome to join in, whenever they want to.

So, let's look at a few parkrun day rules and explain why they are there!

So that run brief? I heard it last week so don't need to hear it again…right?

Nope, and that couldn't be further from the truth! Yes, there will be some recap on the rules we have to have in place, but there may be amends to the course, things to be aware of, as well as some announcements of running milestones. Also, and oh, so importantly, just because it isn't your first time, it doesn't mean that there aren't new people there so they won't have heard it before. All we ask is for 2-3 minutes of silence before you parkrun. Please keep quiet during the run brief. Please also stay in the briefing area and don’t head straight for the start line to get in pole position – again, you may miss an important announcement.

Don't forget your barcode (or #DFYB)

This is the parkrun golden rule. Without a barcode you can't get an official time. You can still take part of course, but please take a finish token and simply give it us back. See also "Ok, so you won't take it off my photo, but you can write it down, yeah?"

What is a funnel ducker?

No, this is not a euphemism, but is a widely-recognised term in parkrunworld for someone who enters the finish funnel then jumps out again without taking a token. This causes issues for the team when processing results as the below explains.

Why should I take a finish token?

When you cross the line into the finish funnel, our timekeepers will click the stopwatch. Every time someone crosses the line, they click. These "clicks" are recorded, and we upload them to a results processing system called webFMS. The data is very simple - it tells us that the 99th runner over the line crossed in 25:00, the 100th runner crossed in 25:10 and so on.
At the end of the funnel you are passed a finish token. These are in numerical order and what we aim to do is ensure that runner 99 gets token number 99. When we scan you and your position token, and upload that to webFMS, the system looks at all of the information and basically says, runner 99 is John Smith and the 99th runner clicked was 25:00 so therefore John Smith's time is 25:00. Simples, eh?
BUT - things can go astray! If runner 99 were to be a funnel ducker, then there is a chance that runner 100 actually gets token 99 - meaning the computer gives Joan Smith 25:00 when she actually got 25:10. Now this doesn't sound much but if a few people do this, then as more and more people enter the funnel (and if a few duck out) then the results get more and more mixed up - still with us?
The same would happen if you refused a token - the person behind would get your time and so on. So, we're not being funny when we say that you must take a token - it's simply how the results are processed. Please simply take the token, then hand it back immediately to one of the volunteers in the finish area.

What if I don't have a barcode and I'm not fussed about a time?

Ideally you would still enter the funnel, collect a token and then pop it in one of our buckets by the barcode scanners. We don't think this is much to ask. But, if you are using the parkrun as part of a long run and want to keep going, or if this above sounds too much like hard work, then please simply don't enter the finish funnel. At Cannon Hill this means not going up the last slope towards the car park, and instead just carry on with your run along the main path. We would prefer it if you did go through the finish, so we can get an accurate number of participants, but if you aren't prepared to wait a few moments in the funnel for a token, please don't go anywhere near the finish line. Our timekeepers often act on anticipation, so please don’t run all the way up to the line and then tell them you don’t want a time, as that will be too late – you’ll have already been clicked by then!

I'm in the funnel but why do I need to stay in order? I've crossed the line so it's ok, yes?

Well, no, actually! On the same basis as what we said about the stopwatch clicks, you will get a more accurate time if you stay in the finish position you entered. Taking a token in order means you'll get your actual time rather than your funnel neighbour's time.

When does the stopwatch start?

Timing starts when the Run Director says "GO". Some of you start your watch as you cross the start line and although this could be a few seconds after the Run Director has started the run, your official time is from the first click on the stopwatch.

Why can't my time be from when I cross the start line?

Resources, simply. We are a free timed run and don't have chip timing as most races do.

These tokens are nice and would look good on a keyring; can I keep them?

Sadly not. The finish tokens are always required back at the end of the run so that we can use them again the following week. If you have your barcode with you, the scanner will retain your position token so it can be sorted back into order. If you've forgotten your barcode, please simply pass the position token to a barcode scanner – please, please, please don't take them home. If you were to do this, and you find it in your pocket, please let us know! We're always relieved to get them back - just email us with the number!

Oh no - I ran a great run today and didn't get scanned until 15 mins after I finished - does that mean my time will be 15 mins more?

No, this isn't the case. Whilst it is always a good idea to get scanned straight after the run, a delay in scanning doesn't add minutes to your finishing time. Remember the tokens we discussed above? The system knows that if you crossed the line in position 200 and collected the appropriate finish token, that your time would match the 200th click on the watch.

I've taken a photo of my barcode on my phone - you can scan that, right?

Actually we can't, sorry. Our scanners cannot read off screens and a photo of a barcode will be locked away with a PIN number so if something were to happen to you, we couldn't access your "In Case of Emergency" (ICE) number. We only accept paper, tag or wrist bracelet barcodes.

Ok, so you won't take it off my photo, but you can write it down, yeah?

Again sadly no. The rules for this are firm and clear and when you access your barcode from your parkrun profile screen, you’ll see that photographs are not permitted. If the volunteers were to do this, there is huge potential for them to be manually adding lots of results from people who didn't apply the rules. The same applies if you have forgotten your barcode. We will not add you to the results for the same reasons.

Sounds a bit mean!

It's not really. Let's put this into context - our volunteers between them have to remember to bring a laptop, stopwatches, scanners, hi-viz, lanyards, folders, tokens, first aid kit, defibrillator, signs and many other pieces of kit to ensure the parkrun happens safely each week. Then it is packed away, results are processed, tokens are sorted, run reports done and social media updated - all we ask is that you bring your barcode - sound OK?

Ok, you've got me. But what happens if my barcode gets smudged or the scanners can't read it?

Now, that's a different story. As you have brought a barcode and for some reason it can't be scanned, then we will write it down for you and add you manually. This is the only occasion where we do this and another reason why we don't write down for people who've forgotten or have it on their phones. We utterly LOVE parkrun and volunteering, but we do like to do other things on a Saturday after the run has finished!

That covers quite a lot and hopefully some things are a bit clearer now. Perhaps you already knew this, but it's quite likely that there is something in there that was news to you. As far as practical, we try to do the results in the Garden Tea Rooms after the run, and you are always welcome to watch and learn. And of course, if there is anything that you are unsure about, please ASK! We're a friendly bunch and want you to come back again and again. Plus, your barcode is your passport to 2,500 parkruns across the globe. No need to re-register!

Whether you're travelling to Brighton or Brisbane, your own parkrun barcode is accepted there!

 

Cannon Hill parkrun 474. 4th January 2020

What a great start to the new decade! Good weather, not wet, not cold and so 865 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 99 were first timers and 72 recorded new Personal Bests.

Aine and Rob were Run Directing and processed the results efficiently and quickly despite dropped tokens, funnel duckers, unscannables and general confusion in the cafe!

The event was made possible by 48 volunteers:

David SANSOM • Helen BLOOMER • Mary ROSS • Andrew WHEELER • Robert Stephen MILLS • Aine ASTBURY • David CHAPMAN • Stephen FORCER • Ian EDGINGTON • Suz WEST • Keith EVANS • Khatma BIBI • Sean MCCONVERY • Elizabeth HOWARD • Oliver KIRKLAND • Karen Barbara LEE • Louise BEASLEY • George ROGERS • Sylvia HUGHES • Chrissie BOYER • Geoffrey HUGHES • Kate DUFFIN • Adrian O'LEARY • William HOUSDEN • Toby HORWOOD • Linda BERESFORD • Jane CLARKE • Janet MOIR • Debbie RINGHAM • Peter HICKMAN • Ron CATTLE • Stuart BRINDLEY • Flora ASTBURY • Tim BATEMAN • Pamela HAYES • Scott BROUGH • Robert SAUNDERS • Ciaran TURNBULL • Greg MCCANN • Peter TRAVIS • Allan POPE • Ceri ARMSTRONG • Adam VINCENT • Marcus CHASTEAUNEUF • David GREEN • Lauren BURTON • Joe FARRAR • Stuart FREETH

Would you like to volunteer? Come along and try any role, any time, it's great fun and very straight forward, Just email us at cannonhill@parkrun.com

Today we had 2 VI guides, Adam and Kate. Thank you. We welcomed Lianne to her first parkrun and she will be looking for a VI guide to walk with her at future events so do email us if you think you can help.

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham Results Page.

The female record is held by Hayley CARRUTHERS who recorded a time of 16:21 on 16th March 2019 (event number 433).
The male record is held by Omer AHMED who recorded a time of 14:38 on 15th June 2019 (event number 446).
The Age Grade course record is held by Tony WRIGHT who recorded 91.83% (16:19) on 26th January 2019 (event number 426).

Cannon Hill parkrun, Birmingham started on 28th August 2010. Since then 25,063 participants have completed 220,690 parkruns covering a total distance of 1,103,450 km, including 35,642 new Personal Bests. A total of 1,937 individuals have volunteered 14,005 times.

 

parkrun 470 14th December

We will be collecting for the B30 food bank on Saturday. See the website for items that are needed https://b30.foodbank.org.uk/give-help/donate-food/

Christmas treats are appropriate but they cannot accept anything with alcohol
Many thanks in advance
Mary and Helen Volunteer Event Directors

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