Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report, 17th October 2020 #31

The Important Visitor from New Zealand

(All characters in this post are completely fictitious).

Whangarei 8

Bob is a dedicated parkrunner from Whangarei parkrun in New Zealand which, as everyone in New Zealand knows, uses the Maori pronunciation so that Whangarei is pronounced “Fon Gar Ray” and not “Wang gar rye” as many people in the UK would assume.

Nick is the run Director for the Wycombe Rye parkrun in the UK which, as everyone in the UK knows is a place in High Wycombe which is pronounced High Wick Ham and not “High Why combe be” as many people outside the UK would assume.

During the Covid pandemic various members of the Wycombe Rye parkrun and Whangarei parkrun made contact via Facebook and shared many stories together; many people found it interesting that two places many miles apart sounded so similar, Whangarei and Wycombe Rye.

Whangarei 1

Now Bob was a great traveller and when the time was right he booked a trip to the UK to see some friends in Loughborough, Leicestershire. He noticed that the Wycombe Rye parkrun wasn’t too far away from London’s Heathrow airport and decided to see if he could stop off at the Wycombe Rye parkrun on the Saturday morning before travelling up to Loughborough.
He contacted the run director to let him know. Nick was so excited. He really wanted to meet someone from Whangarei and introduce him to all the Wycombe Rye runners.

So it was that on the Saturday morning at 8:30 Bob turned into the car park at the Wycombe Lido, he parked up and got his car park ticket. Nick had briefed the volunteers to look out for a Bob from Wang Gar Rye in New Zealand. Bob looked around and spotted a volunteer, he walked over and greeted them.

Whangarei 6

“Hey man, I’m Bob from Fon Gar Ray, I’m looking for a Nick who’s in charge of the why combe be rye parkrun”

The volunteer looked and stared “Fon Gar What? You want a Nick who’s in charge of what?

“Fon Gar Ray, I’m looking for Nick the run director, I’m Bob from New Zealand

“Ah, right, wow, another Bob, that’s, that’s amazing” the penny had dropped, slightly “You want to see Nick the run director, sure, I can find him for you”

The volunteer ran off to find Nick.

Whangarei 9

“Nick, Nick, there’s a bloke called Bob from New Zealand but he’s not from Wang Gar Rye, he’s from Fan Ar Ray, or something like that.”

“You sure he’s not from Wang Gar Rye?” asked Nick

No, it’s definitely not that, he said Fan Ar Ray, although, to be honest, he might be in the wrong place, he kept talking about “why combes and bees and ryes”

“Well, we’ll have to keep our eyes open for Bob from Wang Gar Rye, he should be here by now and I’ve got a special announcement to make to introduce him, and all these New Zealand Flags to wave. You go and lookout for the real Bob and I’ll go and talk to the other Bob.”

Nick made his way over to see the other Bob.

“Hello Bob, lovely to meet you, you’re here from New Zealand, where from exactly?” he turned his ear to listen carefully to the other Bob’s response

“I’m Bob from Fan Ar Ray parkrun in New Zealand, I’m really pleased to be able to join you guys at the why combe bee rye parkrun, this place looks skux today. He gave a thumbs up at the same time he said Skux.

Whangarei 7

Nope, Nick thought to himself, not even close; and not only was he the wrong Bob but he was also in the wrong place and now he thought the place sucks. Nick shrugged his shoulders.

“Ok, Bob, well, welcome to our parkrun, you can be our second honoured guest from New Zealand. Look we’ve even got flags!” Nick turned to the box of flags the volunteers were unpacking.

Bob was distracted from what Nick had said and was looking at the flags.

“So, you’ve got some people from Australia here as well have you?” said Bob, nodding towards the flags.

“Australia. You mean they’re not New Zealand flags? Nick exclaimed

“Nope, too many stars mate, and they’re white, not red”

Now that really does skux thought Nick.

It was getting towards briefing time.

Nick got the volunteers to go out on a final hunt looking for the real Bob.

His instructions were clear “He’ll probably look a bit lost and he’s bound to be wearing black”

Whangarei 5

Everyone in the UK knew that New Zealander’s wore a black t-shirt when in the UK, or the parkrun 100 shirt when they were at parkrun. In the meantime Nick got a message to all the flag wavers to make sure they waved the flag very vigorously when the real Bob turned up, just in case he spotted that the flags had the 6 stars of Australia and not the 4 red stars of New Zealand.

With 15 minutes to go, Nick decided to use the PA system to make a request.

“Would Bob from Wang Gar Rye parkrun in New Zealand please contact Nick the run director as soon as possible, thank you”

Bob took no notice of the announcement; why would he, especially as he was busy introducing himself to the locals and talking about how far he’d travelled from Fan Ar Ray and how skux everyone was looking.

Eventually, for Nick, the time ran out, the real Bob couldn’t be found; the other Bob had made friends with everyone and it was time for the runner’s briefing.

Whangarei 3

He turned on the PA. “Good morning everyone and welcome to Wycombe Rye parkrun”

Bob looked up. What was Wick Ham Rye he thought to himself?

“I’m afraid we have some bad news and some good news for you this morning. The bad news is that our honoured visitor, Bob from Wang Gar Rye parkrun in New Zealand hasn’t been able to make it here today”

The runners let out a disappointed “ohhh”

“But we have got another Bob who has come all the way from Fan Ar Ray, which is also in New Zealand!”

“Hooray!” yelled all the park runners

“Now as we know New Zealand is a very long way away, even further away than Australia, which is a long way away” said Nick

“Only if you fly via Dubai” shouted out one of the runners

“What?” said Nick

“Or Singapore, or Bali” shouted two more

“But not if you fly via the States” shouted the first person

Nick started to look frustrated.

“Or South America” shouted someone else.

There’s a general murmur of agreement from various other runners and discussion on the various ways people have travelled out east, or west if they went via the States.

“What about Japan?”

Nick took a deep breadth

“Look, OK I grant you, New Zealand isn’t quite as far as Australia if you fly from anywhere in the Americas but it is a long way away from anywhere between here and Australia so we want to thank the other Bob for coming so far to join us today.

Whangarei 2

“As you know we’ve been in contact with Bob from Wang Gar Rye on Facebook for many months and it’s a shame that he can’t be here, but, aren’t we lucky to have the other Bob replace the real Bob on this special New Zealand themed day”

“What about the Australian flags” asked someone from the front

“Shhhh” said Nick, frowning at the person who asked and giving a stare that meant don’t ask again.

Meanwhile, Bob walked forward and had a word with Nick. Nick shakes Bob’s hand and they have a laugh.

Nick turns to the runners and lifts the microphone to his mouth.

Whangarei 12

“Special announcement - I’m very pleased to say that we have some good news and no bad news to share with you”

“Hooray” shout nearly all the park runners.

“But what about these Australian flags” asks the person who is not concentrating on the announcements

“Shhhhsss” say a group of runners standing next to him.

“I’ve just been advised that the other Bob from Fan Ar Ray is actually the real Bob from Wang Gar Rye”

The park runners give out another loud cheer, except the runner looking at the Australian flags who who’s still asking what to do with them.

Nick turns to Bob and gives him a wink and a smile then turns to the flag wavers to encourage them to wave the flags faster.

The briefing is finished, and everyone turns to walk to the start line.

Nick and Bob talk to each other on the way to the start line.

Whangarei 10

“Well Nick, that session was skux”

“Are you sure Skux is a good thing Bob? it sounds like another word that doesn’t mean good”

“Ok Nick, just for you it’s been a really cool day, I just hope I don’t have any more problems like that during my stay in the UK.

“Let’s hope so Bob” says Nick

“Now all I need is someone to help me with directions to “Lou goo ber oooo ga” in “Lei Ses Ter Shire” do you know anyone who can help?”

“To be honest Bob, if I were you, I’d type it into Google”

Whangarei 11

********************************

In the absence of parkrun events (not)parkrun is an opportunity for parkrunners to submit a 5k walk, jog, or run, on a route of your choosing, on a day and time of your choice, wherever you are in the world and following appropriate guidelines for physical activity wherever you’re based. You can record up to one activity per day, with your fastest time each week included in a weekly results table.

For more information on (not)parkrun and how to get involved, please visit our FAQs.

Visit profile and add new (not)parkrun here.

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 05/10/2020 – 11/10/2020

39 parkrunners completed 61 (not)parkruns

There were no 'first timers' to (not)parkrun:

But there were Thirteen (not)parkrun Personal Bests:
Steve Hayden, David Morley, Caroline Carter, Mark McCormack, Jo Patterson, Alan D Baker, Martin Daniels, Nicholas Martin, Suzanne Hyde, Stefania Cuccotti, Ally Vincent and Louise Brown.

Well done, everyone!

First three men:
Dominic Reed - Handy Cross Runners (1st, 18:45)
Richard Woodhead - Hazlemere Runners (2nd, 24:10)
Steve Hayden (5th, 26:34)

First three women:
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (3rd, 25:25)
Caroline Bishop (4th, 26:25)
Rachel Marsh - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (8th, 27:16)

Simon Jones
Run Director

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report, 10th October 2020 #30

I've been quiet for a while, so time to catch-up on the (not)parkruns that several of you have been enjoying.

In the absence of parkrun events (not)parkrun is an opportunity for parkrunners to submit a 5k walk, jog, or run, on a route of your choosing, on a day and time of your choice, wherever you are in the world and following appropriate guidelines for physical activity wherever you’re based. You can record up to one activity per day, with your fastest time each week included in a weekly results table.

For more information on (not)parkrun and how to get involved, please visit our FAQs.

Visit profile and add new (not)parkrun here.

 

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 21/09/2020 – 27/09/2020

26 parkrunners completed 37 (not)parkruns

There were no 'first timers' to (not)parkrun:

Three (not)parkrun Personal Bests:
Caroline Bishop (4th, 24:58)
Mark McCormack (9th, 29:28)
Ruth Farwell (18th, 32:25)

First three men:
Pete Catterson (1st, 21:59)
Chris Knight - Hazlemere Runners (2nd, 22:28)
Richard Woodhead - Hazlemere Runners (3rd, 23:50)

First three women:
Caroline Bishop (4th, 24:58)
Veronica Humphrey (8th, 29:20)
Linda Curley (10th, 29:37)

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 28/09/2020 – 04/10/2020

25 parkrunners completed 41 (not)parkruns

56% of the participants were female, yet 70% of the top 10 speeds were set by women, including first place!

There were three 'first timers' to (not)parkrun:
Susan Morton (6th, 27:54)
Rosemary Brereton - Hazlemere Runners (9th, 28:31)
Eve Pilley - High Sheriff of Oxon Challenge Richardsons (12th, 29:53)

Only one (not)parkrun Personal Best:
Rachel Marsh - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (4th, 27:10)

First three women:
Caroline Bishop (1st, 25:02)
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (3rd, 27:08)
Rachel Marsh - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (4th, 27:10)

First three men:
Richard Woodhead - Hazlemere Runners (2nd, 26:55)
Nigel Rose - Marlow Striders (8th, 28:14)
David Morley (10th, 29:11)

Nick Sendall
Co-Event Director

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report, 3rd October 2020 #29

Reasons to be Cheerful – parkrun!

I’ve been a little downbeat recently – so thought I’d perk up with a reflection on some old videos and a bit of a sing-along.  The words are given below the link to the video, I’m sure you will already know the tune.

Apologies to my fellow Old Wycombiensian, Ian Dury! Turn the sound up before following the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=js-Ds4Wcdz4

The lyrics - sing along:

Why don't you get up out of bed? x10

Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
3, 2, 1 Go

Getting up early, feeling rather blurry
Trainers, t-shirt, shorts

Running, jogging walking, Saturday morning
Breakfast, car keys, pause

Looking for your barcode, do another download
Print another copy and out you go

Seeing Beth and Bekah, Douglas, Katt and Lyndsay
Volunteers are ready and the weather’s good

Queue for a weewee, Listen to the briefing
Head to the start line, here we go

I must be barmy, click on my Garmin
Set off steady (but much too fast)

Snake round the grass, head along the path
Going much too fast, no time to stop

Thanking the Marshal, they make me want to sparkle
Today might be special, moving well

Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, 3, 2, 1 (Go)

Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun

Puff, panting screaming, steadying my breathing
Running round the park

Keep with the pacer, trying hard to chase her
This could be my day, sir

Ruth, Simon, Barry, Alistair and Ronnie
Nick, Guy and Jo

Reaching 4k, Feeling great
High-fiving Ray

Timekeeper, Tokens, Scanners and emotions
Chatter, chatter, chatter and cake

A runner with a buggy, a jogger with a doggie
Making a new buddy

Putting on my hoody, heading for the café,
Going for a coffee

Feeling rather nervy but results processed early,
PB celebrations

Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, 3, 2, 1 (Go)

Ah, well, dear, dear
Perhaps next year
But soon we’ll run again

In which case

Timekeeper, Tokens, Scanners and emotions
Chatter, chatter, chatter and cake

A runner with a buggy, a jogger with a doggie
Making a new buddy

Putting on my hoody, heading for the café,
Going for a coffee

Feeling rather nervy but results processed early,
PB celebrations

Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, parkrun
Reasons to be cheerful, 3, 2, 1 (Go)

I don't mind
I don't mind, don't mind, don't mind, don't mind

Nick Sendall
Co-Event Director

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report 26th September 2020 #28

Creative juices have indeed temporarily dried up. So this is your chance to help out by submitting a couple of paragraphs on what you are currently doing on Saturday mornings instead of parkrun! It would be lovely to hear your stories. It doesn't have to be witty (though we've had some fabulous contributions from everyone over the last few weeks) just email in to wycomberye@parkrun.com - preferably add a couple of photos - and we'll do the rest :)

Reasons to be cheerful:

In the absence of parkrun events (not)parkrun is an opportunity for parkrunners to submit a 5k walk, jog, or run, on a route of your choosing, on a day and time of your choice, wherever you are in the world and following appropriate guidelines for physical activity wherever you’re based. You can record up to one activity per day, with your fastest time each week included in a weekly results table.

For more information on (not)parkrun and how to get involved, please visit our FAQs.

Visit profile and add new (not)parkrun here.

 

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 14/09/2020 – 20/09/2020

33 parkrunners completed 49 (not)parkruns

There were four 'first timers' to (not)parkrun:
Bob Healy (4th, 24:45)
Nicola McCarthy (7th, 26:37)
Peter Burt (21st, 33:04)
Rachel Bond - Hughenden Ladies Running Club (38th, 37:40)

Three (not)parkrun Personal Bests:
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (5th, 25:27)
Rachel Marsh - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (10th, 27:45)
Patrick Crotty (30th, 37:45)

First three men:
Dominic Reed - Handy Cross Runners (1st, 18:20)
Chris Knight - Hazlemere Runners (2nd, 21:52)
Pete Catterson (3rd, 22:46)

First three women:
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (HWH3) (5th, 25:27)
Nicola McCarthy (7th, 26:37)
Caroline Bishop (8th, 27:13)

Nick Sendall
Co-Event Director

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report 19th September 2020 #27

Sadly, this is the non-Run Report that didn't get published...

It was going to be a sensible one too - based on the parkrun COVID-19 Framework and how we might implement it - but even last Saturday morning as I typed, it was coming clear that we wouldn't be restarting in October. I paused and then my work (and complete lack of internet connection while away) took over.

Sadly, now, it has been confirmed and that non-Run Report has been shelved - so we are back to non-Run Reports and (not)parkruns, which reminds me:

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 07/09/2020 – 13/09/2020

34 parkrunners completed 50 (not)parkruns

One 'first timer' to (not)parkrun:
Natalie Heath - Hazlemere Runners (18th, 29:48)

Six (not)parkrun Personal Bests:

Simon Jones, Caroline Bishop, Dave Pascoe, Nicola Walker, Laura Bennett and Victoria Leedham

First three men:
Chris Knight - Hazlemere Runners (1st, 21:08)
Pete Catterson (2nd, 21:51)
Simon Jones (3rd, 24:51)

First three women:
Caroline Bishop (4th, 25:00)
Ruth Walne - Your Pace or Mine (6th, 26:06)
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (7th, 26:27)

And tomorrow's Saturday, so I'll have to cheer up and write something a little more upbeat for our 28th non-Run Report.

Nick Sendall
Co-Event Director

 

COVID 19 Update – September 2020

parkrun

Sadly, after significant consultation and discussion, circumstances outside of our control have dictated that parkrun cannot return in England by the end of October, as we had hoped. We know that many people will be disappointed to hear this news, and that it is likely to add further to existing anxieties and frustrations. Please do know that we will continue doing everything we can to support our parkrun family, and we remain committed to reopening parkrun events as soon as circumstances allow and local stakeholders are comfortable.

Since we announced our intent to reopen in England, from an incredibly positive position and with support from DCMS and the Deputy Chief Medical Officers, things have changed. The Government has introduced new restrictions on social gatherings, local lockdowns have been implemented in several regions, and, earlier this week, the Prime Minister suggested that more stringent measures could be in place right through the winter. Understandably, local public health leaders are anxious about groups of people gathering, and, whilst events such as parkrun are exempt from the six person rule, we feel, at this moment in time, that it would be insensitive to push forward with reopening.

Whilst we reluctantly accept this reality, parkrun’s absence will come at a cost. As we head into winter and face the many associated seasonal health issues (both in terms of COVID-19 and other mental and physical illnesses), we believe parkrun has an incredibly important role to play in supporting public health. We also strongly believe that, as existing and emerging evidence suggests, and contrary to popular opinion, that there is little to no risk of COVID-19 transmission at outdoor physical activity events such as parkrun. Increasingly, we are seeing outbreaks traced to indoor work and social environments, yet to date there is little if any evidence of outbreaks directly resulting from participation in outdoor physical activity events.

The health of our nation is facing its greatest challenge in decades, inequalities are increasing, and disadvantaged communities are suffering disproportionately. It is absolutely critical therefore that decisions to restrict activities, particularly where there is a demonstrable public health benefit, are based on robust evidence. And whilst caution should always be taken, where evidence is lacking it should be rapidly developed such that where risk is sufficiently low, activities can be supported to return.

It is essential that, as we map out the coming weeks and months of our collective efforts to get back on our feet, we look beyond baseless assumptions and a culture of fear, and move toward evidence-based interventions. We must act now if we are to avoid irreparable damage to the health and happiness of our communities.

 

parkrun profile: Peter Jemmett

pJ

Number of parkruns: 109

Favourite parkrun (other than Wycombe Rye, obviously!) and why:

I have ran only two other parkruns one being Henley on NYD, but out of the two I guess it would be Taunton Longrun Meadow just because the course was flooded (far worse than the Rye), but I somehow got my best time up to that point.

Why did you start parkrunning:

Following a heart attack in Dec 2016, I decided I needed to work on my health and fitness in order to prevent further cardiac problems, the heart attack being my second coronary angioplasty in just over 3 years. After completing Cardiac Rehab and then Wycombe Wanderers FFIT (football fans in training) courses covering such aspects as diet, nutrition and fitness; parkrun seemed the next natural step, initially to help reach step targets but also to increase my exercise levels.

I had been a bit of a casual runner when I was younger, running several local half-marathons during the 80’s with my last being the Wycombe half marathon in 1993, since then family and other distractions meant that I hadn’t ran again until joining parkrun in Oct 2017

Number of volunteers: 11

Favourite volunteering role, and why:

Tail-walker because I can keep up my step count and you get to talk to, find out about and encourage the slowest person – they’ve all got their own story behind what they hope to achieve and having been through the process this is a great way to give that same support back to the community.

Favourite/funniest parkrun memory:

While under general anaesthetic during a minor surgery I had experienced some atrial fibrillation so ran one Saturday wearing a 24 hour ECG holter heart monitor with the consent of my Cardiologist. Because it was a hot day and I didn’t want the electrodes to rub loose I ran without my shirt … this attracted a few comments and a fair bit of attention with a small posse nurses who followed and guided me down the finish funnel!

What does Wycombe Rye parkrun mean to you:

Without doubt the support, encouragement and friendships, I would never have got beyond my first run without being made to feel so welcome. I also found right from the start that having a timed set course helped to track my progress and set targets for continued improvement, plotting my times on a spread-sheet and seeing the curve dropping week by week helped no end to keep up my motivation and strive for better results.

What do you miss about parkrun:

The comradeship, support and encouragement from my fellow park runners. I live on motivation and find running on my own so much harder.

What running are you doing now:

I try to get out for short runs during the week and maybe a mega longer (up to 14K) alternative parkrun on a Saturday morning.

What is the best bit of running advice you have been given:

Not really advice but encouragement. I was still pushing myself hard but walking great lengths of parkrun due to angina pain when Andy King helped and gave me the belief I could run a full 5K simply by pacing myself and breaking the run down into smaller chunks … I’ve not looked back since, thanks Andy!

What is your favourite run other than parkrun:

I think it will have to be the Ridge Off Roader 10K, the start/finish are exactly where I had my heart attack. Last year this was my first serious run other than parkrun since the 1993 Wycombe half marathon and it was particularly pleasing to be able to run this with many friends that I made through Wycombe Rye parkrun. In the process I raised a further £1,444.00 towards cardiac rehab. bringing the total to £3,461.00 over 3 events.

Special mention must be made of my own ‘Attack the Attack’ run that I have now ran 5 times with 10 members of the ‘Your Pace or Mine’ group. This is the original 11km walk around the Radnage area that led to my heart attack and has now become its own established event, even to the extent that Kris Chaplin produce the special heart shaped medal with a flashing pulse! – Warren Bennet being the first replicant of this prestigious award and the latest your own race director Ruth Walne!

What run would you most like to do in the future, and why:

My ambition fairly simple - to get fitter enough and confident enough to be able to run my first half marathon since 1993. Although not feeling ready I have now decided to run the Maidenhead half marathon course late September as a fund raising effort for Hearts & Souls whose own activities this year have been cancelled due to COVID-19, if you would like to support me on this challenge please visit my JustGiving page

What is your most essential/favourite piece of running kit, and why:

That’s must be my white WWFC shirt. This was given to me when I started the FFIT course and I have worn during nearly all my exercising throughout my rehabilitation. It is symbolic of all I have achieved in the last 3.5 years going right back to those first tentative short walks down the road and back during my convalescence.

What is your Favourite/funniest running memory:

My favourite moment was that final stretch down the road and to the finish line of the Ridge Off Roader, I have never felt so emotional or pumped with adrenaline on a run (and I was determined to run) than covering that ground recalling the events 28 months previous.

 

parkrun profile: Ann Eardley-Wilmot

IMG_0804

Ann Eardley-Wilmot
Number of Parkruns: 139
Favourite Parkrun and why:
I’ve had some great times visiting other Parkruns, my PB was at Leicester’s Victoria Park for instance, but, I think my favourite has to be last year in Canada with my granddaughter Lucy when we did three, one of which was Whistler, when we were warned about bears! We didn’t actually see one until later the same day but it certainly made you keep your wits about you.
Why did I start parkrunning:
My first was in 2008, I had done the couch to 5K around the streets of Marlow and we were off to Portugal for 6 months later that year and I wanted to do a “race” before we went. One of my sons enrolled himself, his brother, who are both runners and me to do Bushey Parkrun. I turned up feeling very excited with all my family there for support. Mike and Jem promised to stay with me and they did despite me saying I couldn’t run on grass! And coming in last when even my grandchildren were embarrassed and the team had put almost everything away. There was no Tail Runner in those days but they did manage to smile at us. My next effort was in 2016 when I joined Mike again on his home PK of Rushmere, although this was my worst result I got the bug. He told me to look for the one near me which had late finishers so that I wasn’t a nuisance. I came to Wycombe anyway and was welcomed by Rebekah France who told me I would never be last – I did get to know a lot of Tail Runners though! Doing this was part of my training for 50k of the Thames Path Challenge - walking of course.
Number of Volunteers: 19
Favourite volunteering role, and why:
My favourite role is finish tokens because you get to meet everyone and they are glad to see you and I also like marshalling at the waterfall watching everyone go by looking hopeful and if you’re lucky you sometimes get in the coffee queue early.

IMG_0928
Favourite/funniest parkrun memory:
I guess my two favourite Parkruns are firstly, when I ran on my 75th birthday in March 2017 and in March 2019 when I ran my 100th. On both occasions I was supported by my family who are now used to me wearing bright, gaudy leggings and on the second occasion my grandson nearly got me a PB. He kept saying you can do it Granny then his Dad and Uncle turned up just after the playground and he and his cousins ran off. The older generation of the Sharman’s didn’t have the same effect.
What does Wycombe Rye mean to me:
I didn’t know anyone when I started in August 2016 but it didn’t matter, Kate Rogers and her daughter Elizabeth were the tail runners on that first occasion and I now feel I know them really well, I met Bob Engel quite early on and I would like to think we are now firm friends. This is surprising since he was a very good runner and I never have been but I am hoping we shall still be doing Wycombe Rye Park Run when we are 80.
I have been a member of loads of organisations over my lifetime but never one which has such a diverse membership in every way and yet all these different people are friendly and encouraging even to slow people like me – so thank you very much for your support.
What do I miss about parkrun:
The turning up every Saturday and looking out for all the people I’ve got to know, doing my best for 45 minutes and having coffee and a chat afterwards.
What walking am I doing now:
I’m very proud that I have twice walked from Marlow to the steps on our Parkrun Course – something I’ve been hoping to do for ages - and back home again. I feel very lucky that I can do so many different walks from home it is doing them which has kept me sane over the last months.
What is the best bit of walking advice you have been given:
Don’t only walk on the Thames Path – walk the Chiltern hills as well. You can only do 50k in a day if you are fit and you don’t have to do the distance before the event. I am not sure I could do it now but I do still make sure I walk up steep hills on most walks.
What is your favourite walk apart from parkrun:
That is very difficult as I enjoy them all but walking to Hambleden on the riverbank and back across footpaths to Rotten Row, Bockmer End, Marlow Common and home is a favourite as well as the Jubilee River from Maidenhead to Eton and back.
What walk would I most like to do in the future, and why:
The Thames path from the Thames Barrier to Runneymede – but not all in one day! Because I thoroughly enjoyed the Runneymede to Henley Thames Path Challenge in 2017.
What is your most essential/favourite piece of walking kit, and why:
My gaudy leggings. They get me out of bed and encourage lots of comments and as I say “all the gear but no idea”

GZLA7987
What is your favourite/funniest walking memory:
Completing half of the Thames Path Challenge with my three sons and with David, my husband in the support vehicle. David turned up with lunch and encouragement at all the stopping points as well as driving us all to the start and home again afterwards. Once my sons accepted that we had to go at my speed they relaxed and acted just how they did when they were kids. We had a great day and thanks to all the donations from friends and family we were able to give lots of money to the Sue Ryder organisation.

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report 12th September 2020 #26

As is often the case with ancient historic events there is scholarly debate as to what actually happened - but it is generally accepted that 12th September 490 BC was the Battle of Marathon (it might have been the 12th August, but that was a Wednesday this year).

Whether it was a messenger sent from Marathon to Athens (25 miles) to announce the Persian defeat by the Greeks, or from Athens to Sparta (150 miles) to ask them for their help, it is from these legends and stories that what we now know as the marathon was born.

Of course for at least the last 26 weeks we have all, in our own way, been running our own marathons - with the finish line still not in sight.

Perhaps it was virtually - to raise money for charity, following the cancellation of an actual event. Others, whether having to self-isolate, or as a frontline worker, are still fighting hard - hoping that they can keep up the pace until the finish. Those who have tried to home educate their children may have now completed their race; but a marathon it was nevertheless.

Of course, if some of the recent parkrun announcements are to be believed, we may be coming to the end of our own "non-parkrun" marathon. Hopefully, there won't be any last minute course corrections just as the finish comes into sight.

And let's hope that unlike our legendary hero, we don't succumb to exhaustion just after making it to the finish.

Very pleased to see that 34 parkrunners did make it to their start and finish, notching up 48 (not)parkruns last week between them  Here's the latest set of (not) results:

(not)parkruns representing Wycombe Rye parkrun: 31/08/2020 – 06/09/2020

One 'first timer' to (not)parkrun:
Lynda Moorcroft (24th, 32:40)

Six (not)parkrun Personal Bests:

Benjamin Smith, Simon Jones, Caroline Bishop, Warren Bennett, Stefania Cuccotti and Laura Rajaram

First three men:
Dominic Reed (1st, 18:20)
Benjamin Smith Vegan runners (2nd, 19:40)
Pete Catterson (3rd, 22:14)

First three women:
Caroline Bishop (5th, 25:03)
Nicola Walker - High Wycombe Hash House Harriers (7th, 27:05)
Katrina Rints - Hazlemere Runners (9th, 27:26)

Anyway, enough of my musing - best get back to my own marathon training:

Snickers_wrapped
Guy Hylton
Run Director

 

Wycombe Rye parkrun non-Run Report, 5th September 2020 #25

We've now missed 25 weeks of parkrun - here's a story about how I have simultaneously obtained a lovely non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt - I am proudly wearing it as I type this:

Now there was once a co-Event Director who was absolutely insane about new parkrun t-shirts and one day, two swindlers came to sell him what they said was a non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt. Now, they held up this particular garment and they said, "co-ED, this is a magic parkrun t-shirt." Well, the truth of the matter is, there was no parkrun t-shirt there at all. But the swindlers were very smart, and they said, "co-ED, to a wise parkrunner this is a beautiful raiment but to a fool it is absolutely invisible." Naturally, the co-ED not wanting to appear a fool, said,

"Isn't it grand! Isn't it fine! Look at the cut, the style, the line!
The non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt is all together
But all together it's all together
The most remarkable parkrun t-shirt that I have ever seen.
These eyes of mine at once determined
The sleeves are velvet, the neck is ermine
The body is blue and the logo is a lovely shade of green.
Somebody send for the Run Director."

Well they sent for the RD and they quickly explained to her about the magic parkrun non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt. And naturally, the RD not wanting to appear a fool, said,

"Well, isn't it oh! Isn't it rich! Look at the charm of every stitch!
The non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt is all together
But all together it's all together
The most remarkable parkrun t-shirt that I have ever seen.
These eyes of mine at once determined
The sleeves are velvet, the neck is ermine
The body is blue and the logo is a lovely shade of green.
Somebody send for the Volunteers."

Well the Volunteers convened, and you never saw in your life as many people as were at that gazebo. All the Marshals, the Bar Code Scanners, the Time Keepers, the Tail Walkers, it was just luminous pink with people in high viz, and they were all told about the magic non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt. And after they were told they naturally didn't want to appear fools and they said,

"Isn't it ohhh! Isn't it ahhh! Isn't it absolutely wheee!
The non-Volunteer '25' t-shirt is all together
But all together it's all together
The most remarkable parkrun t-shirt a tailor ever made.
Now quickly, put it all together
With running clobber, high viz and trainers
It's all together the thing to wear at Saturday's parkrun.
Leading the 3-2-1 Go!"

Now Saturday came and The Rye was just lined with hundreds, and hundreds, and hundreds of parkrunners, and the Marshals all were cheering as the runners came by, the walkers marched by, the joggers galloped by. And everybody was cheering like mad, except one little boy. You see, he hadn't heard about the magic parkrun t-shirt and didn't know what he was supposed to see. [He had not been listening at the briefing and didn't even know he was supposed to stay within arm's length of his responsible adult].  Well, as he came into the Finish Funnel the little boy looked and, horrified, said,

"Look at the co-ED! Look at the the co-ED! Look at the co-ED, the co-ED, the co-ED!
The co-ED is in the all together
But all together the all together
He's all together as naked as the day that he was born.
The co-ED is in the all together
But all together the all together
It's all together the very least the co-ED has ever worn."

All the Run Directors positioned to call an intermission
The co-ED is wide open to ridicule and scorn

The co-ED is in the all together
But all together the all together
He's all together as naked as the day that he was born.
And it's all together too chilly a morn!

**********

I look forward to seeing you all again one chilly morn - and don't worry, I'll wrap up warm!

(Special thanks to happy memories of the older Saturday morning ritual of listening to Junior Choice - with apologies to both Hans Christian Andersen & Danny Kaye)

Nick Sendall
co-Event Director

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